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Discussion Starter #1
I have my carputer (laptop) connected to my sylfex auxmod and I want to keep this connection permanent. Is it possible to have another auxillary input jack for other things? I know I can use the microphone jack on my laptop, but isnt that mono...? (also It will be more distorted going through the laptop). Do they have audio cables that take in two sources and combine them (I don't think that works but I don't really know..). Or would my only option be some sort of audio hardware switch that can change the channels?
 

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for only a few dollars you can pick up a mini-stereo or rca splitter, or make your own combo rca/mini stereo cable. splitters are cheap at radio shack. for greater versitility you can always buy the ends & make your own.
 

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for only a few dollars you can pick up a mini-stereo or rca splitter, or make your own combo rca/mini stereo cable. splitters are cheap at radio shack. for greater versitility you can always buy the ends & make your own.
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The problem with the splitter is that it can end up sending signal back into the other sources output. A better option would be to use a switch, like this

http://www.partsexpress.com/pe/showdetl.cf...tnumber=180-932

they make less specialized ones, but i couldn't find the link quickly. This is an item that they would carry at radioshack also.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The problem with the splitter is that it can end up sending signal back into the other sources output. A better option would be to use a switch, like this

http://www.partsexpress.com/pe/showdetl.cf...tnumber=180-932

they make less specialized ones, but i couldn't find the link quickly. This is an item that they would carry at radioshack also.
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Yeah, thats why I wasn't sure if it worked or not, and it doesnt seem very proffesional either. Ive tried searching for some switches but they all look too fancy for something that just needs to connect 3 wires together (Im on a budget). If any of you guys see a simple $5 switch let me know.
 

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if you're worried about feedback add a diode.

or make your own switch with relays (electronic) or SPDT (mechanical)
 

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i'm all about keeping it affordable. i get a little scared off when the price starts to creep up.
 

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Is there any solution out there for splitting (and using) two items at one time???? For instance, I have an iPod (Auto-Link connector), Sirius Satellite (FM Mod type) and soon, Nav. Would like to use all 3 at the same time (purchasing a direct-connect Sirius system).

Sorry to hijack the thread.....
 

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if you have the AudioLink iPod, why not use the 3.5mm jack input for your SAT? the sound quality will be noticeably better. you can always use the 3.5mm for multiple inputs with a splitter, like this:
 

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if you're worried about feedback add a diode.
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How would the diode work? The audio signal is AC and low amplitude. All I see the diode doing is clipping about half of the signal waveform in a very non-linear fashion.

You could use some resistors to buffer the outputs from each other, but that would destroy the output impedance of the audio sources. I think a setup using switches and/or relays would be about the only good option.
 

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a diode is like a one way valve. EDIT- to <strike>clip</strike> convert an AC signal to a DC signal you would use what's called a bridge rectifier, which is a system four diodes.

any audio singal from a personal audio device, i.e. mp3 player, ipod, sat radio, is low voltage, like ~3 volts AC.

a diode does drop signal voltage slightly ~.7V depending on type.
 

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a diode is like a one way valve.
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So how exactly will a diode block an AC signal? When the waveform swings in one direction, the diode will block the signal, but not when the signal is at the opposite polarity. This will clip the signal, not block it. The diode will become what is known as a half-wave rectifier.

to clip an AC signal to a DC signal you would use what's called a bridge rectifier, which is a system four diodes.
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Converting and AC waveform to DC through the use of a full-wave rectifier is not the same as clipping a waveform (whether by using a half-wave rectifier or another means).

any audio singal from a personal audio device, i.e. mp3 player, ipod, sat radio, is low voltage, like ~3 volts AC.
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Many pre-amp level signals can be 2V peak or even less. Attenuating this by a diode drop is really bad for the signal-to-noise ratio.
 

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thanks for setting me straight. i was working off the top of my head & after a few minutes google search i see was was wrong. the diode would only be useful in a DC application which this obvoiously isn't.
 
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