Mazda 6 Forums banner

21 - 40 of 260 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,334 Posts
what's all this about clutch adjustments?

what about all these posts saying the fresh-from-the-factory clutch setting is 100% perfect and everyone who cant handle the stock on-off clutch just needs to learn how to drive a stick?

or do those now get filed under the same "told you so" as the powerloss threads?
[/b]
Well, to be fair, it's possible some cars came better adjusted than others. There does seem to be very significant differences in personal experiences with the clutch. I always try to look for the positives to every situation, and this clutch controversy has led me to learn how to set up the clutch myself, so now I can fine tune it to the way I like it. If this hadn't happened I'd be blissfully driving around forced to endure whatever setting the assembler happened to feel like doing that day. :)


You can also add the speed6 is barely faster than a 6s threads.

I've gotten used to the speed6 clutch. It's pretty brutal though. Everyone who's ever driven my car had a hell of time with the clutch.
[/b]
Hey btf, it might still be worth trying out the adjustment to see what you think. You can always return it to stock if you mark the stop bolt and count the number of turns. Once you've done it the second time is quite quick. I did have to give my leg a bit of time to readjust though, as I had been trying to learn the clutch. But the re-learning curve was way shorter than the first time as I was going to back to reflexes learnt from 30yrs of the same type of clutch feel and action.

To all of you, do be a favour if you can. Even if you don't try the adjustment, take a look at the color of your spring, as mentioned in bold 3/4 the way through my posting. Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
305 Posts
Excellent write up!

I have a question.
OK you shorten the rod and adjust the pedal stop leaving some play between the acuation rod and cylinder - So,based on this adjustment, you have lowered the pedal - but how much travel does the pedal require? if you shorten the rod up too much, you will find that you are putting the pedal through floor. The obvious is to have it stop prior to hitting the floor - but how can you measure the travel? Is there anyway of ensuring you have addressed both ends of travel (engage and disengage) ensuring both are met?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
721 Posts
This was a fantastic write up. The theory sounds solid too and makes perfect sense. As far as the comment about people being fine with the clutch is concerned, I think this proves even further that there is nothing wrong with the clutch itself and it's engagement characteristics ie. clamping force, pedal effort etc. The problem lay in getting used to the height off the floor and distance to full release of the pedal. My gripe was the timing of the clutch foot and the throttle foot because the clutch would require a few inches of movement before my throttle foot could start to move which threw off my timing and required me to play catch up with the gas pedal. Both issues are are solved with this adjustment.

Here's to early clutch engagement! Cheers! :cheers:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,334 Posts
Excellent write up!

I have a question.
OK you shorten the rod and adjust the pedal stop leaving some play between the acuation rod and cylinder - So,based on this adjustment, you have lowered the pedal - but how much travel does the pedal require? if you shorten the rod up too much, you will find that you are putting the pedal through floor. The obvious is to have it stop prior to hitting the floor - but how can you measure the travel? Is there anyway of ensuring you have addressed both ends of travel (engage and disengage) ensuring both are met?
[/b]
Hi ManyMazdas, this was my concern as well. I wanted to be sure I didn't adjust the pedal so far that it wasn't fully disengaging when the pedal was pushed to the floor, or not fully re-engaging when the pedal was released.

The way to test for full disengagement (pedal to floor) is the test drive described in step 16. Push the pedal to the floor, with car in gear. See if the car creeps forward or the engine revs seem to be lower than usual, indicating clutch drag. If there is, back out the stop bolt!
If everything is fine, then let the clutch out slowly to feel the point at which it starts to engage. On mine, after adjustment, it's a couple of inches of travel before it starts to engage. This tells me that I'm well past the point of disengagement of the clutch (as shown in the last 3 graphs) Based on this I'm confident with my set up to drive it as is, and I've driven it now for about 50kms with absolutely no issues. No gear grinding during shifts, no creeping at stops, nothing. Just great clutch action and fast shifts! Again, I'm not even sure the stop bolt has enough adjustment to put the pedal to a point where full disengagement won't occur with pedal fully to the floor.

There really isn't a way to test for full engagement. The only way to guarantee there is full engagement is to be sure that the clutch cylinder piston acutator rod is not pressing on the piston, partially engaging it, when the pedal is fully released. You do this as described in steps 12, 13, 14, 17, and as shown in the diagram below step 18. By ensuring there is a slight amount of space between the end of the actuator rod and the piston you're ensuring the clutch cylinder is fully releasing.
This is not as hard to do as it sounds. It was very easy for me to feel the free play once I got under the car and knew where to look. You can't quite visually see the clearance, but you can see the end of the piston that the actuator rod contacts, and see the actuator rod move slightly before the piston starts to move. Again, by doing this you're ensuring the clutch is fully released. Adjust the amount of free play as you feel comfortable with. I chose to go with just a hair of free play, but you can adjust in more to begin with. Once you've done the adjustment once you'll see how easy it is. The next time will probably only take 5-10 minutes.

Get a good light source. I mtn bike a lot and am familiar with head mounted lighting systems. Bike use ones are usually too powerful and bulky for this, so I picked up one designed for hikers and campers. It cost $18 and is a 3 LED light mounted on a head band, with the batteries contained in the lamp unit. I got it from my local Moutain Equip Coop but any good outdoor shop will have them. It's great for doing this kind of work. It's adjustable for vertical angle so there is always light where you're looking, while keeping both your hands are free.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
I just did this mod not even 30 minutes ago. It feels like I'm driving a totally different car now. For me, the whole soft-stiff-soft feel over the throw of the clutch pedal is now gone. The throw is all one solid motion with the same feel throughout. This is a must for all MS6 owners.


EDIT:
I used between 2 and 2.5 turns as my adjustment. The clutch engages and disengages fully. You can actually look at where the rod connects to the piston in the firewall and see how much play it has before it actually depresses it, thus no worries about full engagement after this mod. Just be sure to pay attention to the plunger in the firewall.

Also, my car was manufactured sometime in January 2006 I believe (I have the inspection report signed at the end of Jan 06) and my clutch spring is painted WHITE as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
721 Posts
just got back from the dealer tonight. had them do the adjustment. Service was closed by the time i picked it up so i couldn't ask how many turns it took but YES! THIS IS A MUST DO ADJUSTMENT FOR ALL MPS OWNERS!

This is how it should have come from the factory. no more having to retrain muscle memory for soft-hard-soft. it used to feel like 3-4 inches of play before the clutch even thought about engaging, now it's closer to 2" or so. It's nice and consistent. Shifts are smoother with less bog between each because clutch is now slipping between shifts instead of being dumped like before. should make for faster ET. I will have to ask RT99EH for another test day to see what diff this makes in the 1/4 mile.

DO THIS MOD!!!!

And if you don't want to do this because you're afraid that you're going to mess it up. Take it to your dealer and demand they make this adjustment. They tried to tell me there was no adjustment on a hydraulic clutch but i I told them that there were members on this board that had done it so they looked into it and sure enough all's good in MPS land! Just make sure they don't try and charge you for it. I said it should have come adjusted from the factory and that this was a formal complaint/issue not just a request. They didn't charge me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
721 Posts
call me cynical but I forsee:

warranty service: denied
reason: clutch modified from stock
[/b]
clutch isn't covered under warranty. wear and tear item like brakes. but they didn't put the adjustment on the work order so if there's ever a problem, they have no record of the work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
clutch isn't covered under warranty. wear and tear item like brakes. but they didn't put the adjustment on the work order so if there's ever a problem, they have no record of the work.
[/b]
they'll blame your AWD going out on your "modified" clutch. hell, they'll blame your power windows stopped working due to your clutch modification.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,334 Posts
If you don't want to take the risk, drive the car the way it came. That's your choice. Nobody is forcing you to do it. And I think everybody on this forum is well aware of the possible consequences of doing anything to the car in regards to warranty. There's enough discussion on all the threads about it.

Personally, I really don't believe there will be any issues. I've driven my adjusted clutch for 3 days now, and there is no creep, no issues with grinding or notchiness during shifting, no issues with full engagement, nothing. Clutch is disengaging and re-engaging fully. Take-offs are far smoother, with less time slipping the clutch, shifts are faster, again with less slipping or jerkiness of clutch take-up. If anything, due to the improved feel and smoother, quicker engagement allowed by the re-adjustment, the clutch disc should actually last longer than if it was left alone. Less slipping and less shock equals longer clutch life.

If the dealer is going to give you a hassle because the clutch was re-adjusted, they're going to hassle you for anything you do. You'd better not change the oil yourself, or put on a CAI. Don't even think of going near anything really mechanical.

For those of us that did it ourselves, the dealer hasn't a clue that it was done anyways. For me, it's transformed the way the car drives, and has provided the most significant improvement in the driving experience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
403 Posts
Discussion Starter #31
If you don't want to take the risk, drive the car the way it came. That's your choice. Nobody is forcing you to do it. And I think everybody on this forum is well aware of the possible consequences of doing anything to the car in regards to warranty. There's enough discussion on all the threads about it.

....

For those of us that did it ourselves, the dealer hasn't a clue that it was done anyways. For me, it's transformed the way the car drives, and has provided the most significant improvement in the driving experience.
[/b]
A big amen, and of course everybody will naturally just keep their pie-holes shut about clutch pedal adjustments if their clutch happens to go. Enough of these clutches have been replaced under warranty that if one goes, the last thing they'll think about in terms of cause is a 2-1/2 turn change to the clutch pedal. Especially since the most likely cause is repeated hard launching or repeated 3rd gear take-offs. At the Houston Zoom-Zoom Live the latter was so common that the guy on the mike at the Mazdaspeed challenge was having to beg people to doublecheck their gear position. Nevertheless, the smell of burning clutch was really strong.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
272 Posts
As requested... my springs have white paint, build date 03/06... now off to make the ajdustment :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,334 Posts
Also, my car was manufactured sometime in January 2006 I believe (I have the inspection report signed at the end of Jan 06) and my clutch spring is painted WHITE as well.
[/b]

As requested... my springs have white paint, build date 03/06... now off to make the ajdustment :)
[/b]
Thanks for checking guys. So, 3 people (including me) have reported in and all the springs appear to have the same spring rate (based on assumption color coding represents spring rate). I'll keep a running count:

Supercar - Skoda: 05/06 White spring
PedalPuncher: 01/06 White spring
99 RT Eh: 03/06 White spring
Mr.trees: 02/06 White spring
wannaSpeed: 02/06 White spring
dj petey: 08/05 White spring
SSinstaller: 12/05 White spring
MS686: ?? White spring


Updated, as of Sept 22 eight owners have reported in and all have the white spring.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
676 Posts
I made a PDF of this for easy printing. Skoda hope you dont mind :D PS you rule
Clutch Adjustment
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,334 Posts
I made a PDF of this for easy printing. Skoda hope you dont mind :D PS you rule
Clutch Adjustment
[/b]
Don't mind at all MS686. Thanks for making the pdf and giving me credit in the file name. I'm happy and flattered that you guys found it useful.

Have you done yours yet? Let me know what you think, and also, what color spring is on your car. So far they're all white, so maybe the issue is solely how the clutch was set up, rather than an actual difference in spring rates.

Maybe for the first few production runs there wasn't a defined set of specs on where to set up the stop bolt and actuator rod adjustment so different assemblers were just doing it whatever the way they wanted, and then word got back to Mazda so they tightened up their process and came out with a proper procedure with specs in later runs? This would be an unusual circumstance, but on the other hand, if Mazda started a special assembly line just for MS6s, it could have been an operational oversight.
Just trying to come up with theories why there seem to be such significant differences in the way people are perceiving the clutch.

If mine had come the way I've re-adjusted it to I would never have paid any special notice to it because it would have felt just like most other clutches I've used before.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
113 Posts
I thought this sounded interesting and was going to try adjusting my clutch, but I noticed on mine taht when fully depressed, the clutch arm hits the firewall. Were your's the same or does this mean I have no room for adjustment? Thanks in advance for the help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
403 Posts
Discussion Starter #40
I thought this sounded interesting and was going to try adjusting my clutch, but I noticed on mine taht when fully depressed, the clutch arm hits the firewall. Were your's the same or does this mean I have no room for adjustment? Thanks in advance for the help.
[/b]
I've got 12K mi. on mine and the rubbery material in front of the firewall is really smashed to smithereens. I don't think this has any effect on the pedal adjustment. It just means the firewall gets smacked every time you step on the clutch. You'd think they'd put an actual rubber bumper or some such.
 
21 - 40 of 260 Posts
Top