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Discussion Starter #1
Just wondering, if there is a supplier out there for adjustable control arms that allows us to dial in more camber for out MS6's?

Wayne
 

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not as of yet that i know of. if things are the same as the regular 6 there were some non-adjustables coming out soon i believe. and my car should have the test setup done next week for adjustables if things go well.
 

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You can make adjustable control arms farily easily. I made some rear adjustable upper controls arms for my talon. Quite easy to do. Just used some swedge tubing and heim joints. Have LOTS of adjustment. I can't find my pictures of them off the car so I may have to try to get a few of them on the car. Either way, its quite easy to do and doesn't really require much work aside from ordering some parts.
 

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If the suspension is the same as the regular 6, then someone probably makes wider range cam bolts. Check with SPC, they are usually the leaders in aftermarket cam bolts that give you about 4° of adjustment in each direction.
 

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If the suspension is the same as the regular 6, then someone probably makes wider range cam bolts. Check with SPC, they are usually the leaders in aftermarket cam bolts that give you about 4° of adjustment in each direction.[/b]
There are no cambolts on the front to begin with, where would these proposed ones go?

I'm desperate for a good camber solution for the front. I don't know that the heim joint solution will work with the front suspension assembly, I'd have to back and look again. I don't think so though.
 

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There are no cambolts on the front to begin with, where would these proposed ones go?

I'm desperate for a good camber solution for the front. I don't know that the heim joint solution will work with the front suspension assembly, I'd have to back and look again. I don't think so though.[/b]
Hmmm. I thought there were in the front. I'll have a peek.
 

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Cam bolts wont work since we have double-wishbone suspension, but SPC just released a replacement upper ball joint that will allow +/- 1.5 camber adjustment. We will have them for sale on our site in the next day or so. We're trying to get a little more information regarding installation prior to pushing them out the door.
 

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ok i have to ask......why do you want adjustable arms the car has a double wishbone so camber does not change with compression. so what do you really need them for? if you lower the car the camber stays the same.
 

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People who take their car to the track, autocross, or prefer a more performance oriented setup can appreciate the benefits of negative camber. So, people aren't looking for a way to square up the car, they're looking for a way to add more negative camber.
 

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i know i've been looking for that reason for 3 years now! we just need a solution out there. i appreciate you guys confirming/checking the install before getting these out to everyone as well!
 

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Cam bolts wont work since we have double-wishbone suspension, but SPC just released a replacement upper ball joint that will allow +/- 1.5 camber adjustment. We will have them for sale on our site in the next day or so. We're trying to get a little more information regarding installation prior to pushing them out the door.[/b]
Works on a Miata. Double wishbone front and rear. Adjusted by cam bolts front and rear.
 

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Works on a Miata. Double wishbone front and rear. Adjusted by cam bolts front and rear.[/b]
Because of the design, is there any problem with it coming out of adjustment? It looks like you rotate it to increase camber, so it would be dependent on the top nut staying torqued?

Other wise I love the solution and will seriously look at it before I do some DE events.

Wayne
 

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Because of the design, is there any problem with it coming out of adjustment? It looks like you rotate it to increase camber, so it would be dependent on the top nut staying torqued?

Other wise I love the solution and will seriously look at it before I do some DE events.

Wayne[/b]
None that I've seen. A buddy of mine runs in spec Miata and has never has a cam bolt come loose or shift.
 

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None that I've seen. A buddy of mine runs in spec Miata and has never has a cam bolt come loose or shift.[/b]
He's refering to the adjustable ball joint for the front of the 6, not the cambolts on the miata or rear of the 6. I share the concern with the ball joint solution. WIthout knowing exactly how it's all put together, I worry about it a little. If it got me a degree and a half or more, it'd be worth it though.
 

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He's refering to the adjustable ball joint for the front of the 6, not the cambolts on the miata or rear of the 6. I share the concern with the ball joint solution. WIthout knowing exactly how it's all put together, I worry about it a little. If it got me a degree and a half or more, it'd be worth it though.[/b]
It's actually adjusted by moving the ball joint back and forth in a slide plate. The locknut on top holds it into place. SPC's torque specification for the locknut is 120 ft-lbs. SPC has been using this design for years on Hondas and other imports. If it's properly torqued, there won't be an issue.
 

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It's actually adjusted by moving the ball joint back and forth in a slide plate. The locknut on top holds it into place. SPC's torque specification for the locknut is 120 ft-lbs. SPC has been using this design for years on Hondas and other imports. If it's properly torqued, there won't be an issue.[/b]
Do you basically just press/bolt the thing in, loosen the locknut, push in the top of the kingpin and tighten the locknut down? Looks pretty simple. Are these thinkgs in-stock at RPM? They seem like the perfect add-on for AutoX. Do you happen to know if they are permitted under Street Prepped class rules with the SCCA? I'll go look for that answer now myself, but I thought I'd ask.

Do you happen to know if they are permitted under Street Prepped class rules with the SCCA? I'll go look for that answer now myself, but I thought I'd ask.[/b]
Did the work myself. Camber Bolts are cited as legal in SP, Iassume this falls under that general designation.
 

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Do you basically just press/bolt the thing in, loosen the locknut, push in the top of the kingpin and tighten the locknut down? Looks pretty simple. Are these thinkgs in-stock at RPM? They seem like the perfect add-on for AutoX. Do you happen to know if they are permitted under Street Prepped class rules with the SCCA? I'll go look for that answer now myself, but I thought I'd ask.
Did the work myself. Camber Bolts are cited as legal in SP, Iassume this falls under that general designation.[/b]
Any real solution to this as of yet? Starting Auto X this year and want to add some neg camber. What is needed and from whom? Thanks
 

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The SPC camber adjustable ball joints are in stock at RPM. You can order them here:

http://www.therpmstore.com/product_info.php?products_id=393

They are in stock and ready to ship!

Despite what the manufacturer states, you can achieve approximately 3 degrees of negative camber with this kit if your car is lowered. I wasn't able to get an exact reading of the maximum adjustment as it was too extreme for the alignment tool. When we set it at maximum negative camber, the sensors on the alignment machine would not line up properly, so it wouldn't give a reading. The machine at the dealership isn't made for aligning race cars, after all. ;) The technician doing the alignment has been doing it for 30 years and he said it was easily -3 degrees, or possibly as much as -4. This was with the car lowered approximately 1.5 inches.

Personally, I opted for -1.5 degrees in the front and -1.2 degrees in the rear, with toe set at 0 degrees for all 4 wheels. Caster is not adjustable on the 6, but the technician said that it doesn't make much of a difference on modern vehicles.

Why did I choose -1.5 degrees? Based upon various articles I read, -1.5 degrees is the maximum negative camber that is recommended for a daily driven street car. Anything beyond that will cause excessive wear to the tires. Cars that are aggressively tuned for the track are typically set in the -2.5 to -3.0 degrees range. For the record, -1.2 degrees is the factory spec for the rear on the Mazda 6, so I figured I'd leave it at that.

Also, making camber adjustments can drastically affect toe, so it's not recommended to adjust camber yourself unless you can also correctly set the toe. When I first installed the camber kit, I had a huge amount of toe in. This lead to very strange handling and I could tell the tires were being worn a lot due to the sounds they were making. My tires are nearly bald and I'm about to get new ones, so I didn't care. But I'd recommend taking the car directly to the alignment shop after these are installed.

I created this how-to for those that wish to do the installation themselves.
 

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Nice - thats doesn't seem too intense. Maybe 45 minutes a side? Are the adjustable arms poly bushings, OEM rubber, or none?
 
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