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Hey everyone, got the car back today.

They fixed my door insulation (thank God, the car was WAY too loud), but no luck on finding the cause of my bad MPGs. They checked MAF, filters, injectors, etc. They even said injector cleaning at 30k is part of their maintenance plan.

On the upside, Andy is the Master tech at Tustin Mazda, and he is the most awesome tech from a dealer I have ever talked too. Per my personal request, he took the car in the back and gave me all the diagnostic print outs to see if anything came up. Nothing did, but still nice of him to do so.

Other than that, I guess I will be going the fuel additive route to see if that helps as it did in your case.

Other than that, the only thing I can report is that I am due for tires and I am going with Michelin Pilot Super Sports. I will do some canyon carving and report back. Soon, I am planning on adding a swaybar and upgrading to EBC pads and rotors, and also adding in a drop in filter. Nothing major to the car after that. MAYBE some auto.exe stuff, but without Torsional-Stiffness here to answer my questions I am holding off!


Did they check the intake Valves? Oh, well, someday somebody will.


BTW I noticed my mileage dropping too, so I dumped the techron in the current tank. I also checked my tires for the first time since the warm fall and they were down to 25psi...ok that explains it. So I got them back up to 35ish, and I expect mileage to substantially improve. With the colder weather it definitely drops the tire pressure. Interesting the TPMS never said boo. That explains the recall, but man I don't want any warnings flashing at me all the time like it has been for some people.
 

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Shoot, I totally forgot to ask about the intake valves! Sorry :( I will def ask next time I go in though. I haven't had time for the fuel cleaner, but it's on my to do list. Injectors, MAF, everything else has been checked off, so I am really bummed.

But after driving the Mustang V6 rental, I was dying for the Mazda back. That stang was FAST, but the whole car felt like junk (only 12k miles on it). The brakes were better, but that's it. Every corner I took there was massive body roll, and the suspension and tires were terrible. I seriously can't believe people pay money for that car, even if you LOVE muscle cars and MUST have one, I would as a consumer absolutely refuse to pay for such a shoddy product. Made me appreciate my car a lot more, definitely didn't feel like an economy car, but more of that 'premium' space before you hit 'entry level luxury'. I am sure the updated Mazda 6 will close that gap even further when optioned with the GT trim interior. The steering and transmission are worth it alone (check out this video to learn more). But that mustang though... good lord, a 2013 Corolla interior would put that abomination to shame. And the steering was awful. And every time I went over speed bumps, the whole interior and chassis would "breathe" and creak (Torsional_Stiffness would have had a field day on that car). It was an absolute rental car queen, nothing more. Fast? Yes? A cheap pile of metal and plastic? Double yes.

Overall, I love my car, but need to figure out why my mileage is so shitty. I am worried if I really start driving the car how I wanted to, I would definitely dip into the teens. I am at 23.2 at CONSERVATIVE driving, about 60/40 city/hwy. Even when driving the same mix for the first 10k miles, I was easily getting 28-29 mpg. When I went roadtripping up north, I got 440 on my tank up there and just under 430 on my way back (and I did quite a few aggressive passes on the freeways, so I could have hypermiled and gotten another 100 miles, I am sure of it). Nowadays, cracking 300 is a mission, and I fill around 13.5 gallons each time , give or take 1/2 gallon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #64 ·
definitely run the techron and a few tanks of premium oc cc. I made the same run up to nashville this weekend that I did a few weeks ago (and posted this thread). I returned 36 on the way up, and dropped to about 35 by the time I got home (80-85 the whole way home.. I was sick of driving *shrug*) So my MPG is right back where it should be.... I would expect better, but with winter time, and tires due for replacement AND it's time for my next maintenance (37K) this coming week. I'll take it, because that's a LOT stacked against those #'s.

P.S. Injector cleaning definitely wasn't part of the regular 30K... if it was techron would NOT have fixed my problem (that or it was crap built up on the valves), and mine was a premium full circle service at 30K....
 

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definitely run the techron and a few tanks of premium oc cc. I made the same run up to nashville this weekend that I did a few weeks ago (and posted this thread). I returned 36 on the way up, and dropped to about 35 by the time I got home (80-85 the whole way home.. I was sick of driving *shrug*) So my MPG is right back where it should be.... I would expect better, but with winter time, and tires due for replacement AND it's time for my next maintenance (37K) this coming week. I'll take it, because that's a LOT stacked against those #'s.

P.S. Injector cleaning definitely wasn't part of the regular 30K... if it was techron would NOT have fixed my problem (that or it was crap built up on the valves), and mine was a premium full circle service at 30K....
I will definitely have to give it a try. Basically add a bottle of that when I have about 5 gallons, correct?

On the injector cleaning... not surprised that the service adviser had no clue what he was talking about... I would trust your word over his, esp. since you passed the 30k mark
 

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P.S. Injector cleaning definitely wasn't part of the regular 30K... if it was techron would NOT have fixed my problem (that or it was crap built up on the valves), and mine was a premium full circle service at 30K....
Apart from Tecron I always use Shell gas because it has Nitrogen enriched cleaning system which removes gunk from intake valves and fuel injectors. This ensures your injectors are always clean and then give the Tecron treatment every 3 months to clean up what Shell gas could not.

Shell Nitrogen Enriched Gasolines - United States
 

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As reported here above, by a member, "rough idling" at 25k...there was a TSB on that (Bulletin 01-003/13). Though it covers the 2012-2013 Mazda3s and 2013 CX-5 with the 2.0L Sky-Activ G, it is essentially the same engine as ours, albeit a larger 2.5L displacement (same 13-14:1 compression ratio).

I'll do a pro-active approach and run premium, indefinitely. Almost always, premium has a slight detergent advantage..over regular. With gas at its lowest in several years..I'll be running Top Tier 91RON Costco, with Chevron Techron Injector cleaner regimen every 2,500mi. With a lack of long term history of the Sky-G (no known engine tear down of cyl heads for reference, as of date), its cheap insurance. No harm, no foul. Every bit helps...
 

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Discussion Starter · #71 ·
I will definitely have to give it a try. Basically add a bottle of that when I have about 5 gallons, correct?

On the injector cleaning... not surprised that the service adviser had no clue what he was talking about... I would trust your word over his, esp. since you passed the 30k mark
Close, go down to empty and dump the big bottle for SUV/Trucks (treats 22Gallons) then fill up with 5-8 gallons. It's what I have ALWAYS done, but again.. a bit more cautiously on this car, LOL.


FWIW, I got 38MPG on the way home today, 3rd fill since techron, and running 93 exclusively. That's better than I've EVER gotten on my trip home from work. New tires with low rolling resistance and the same weight as stock going on friday.. :D

It's peppy, getting good MPG, and should be significantly quieter with the new tires.. I'm happy again *shrug* LOL. (for now)
 

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I'll do a pro-active approach and run premium, indefinitely. Almost always, premium has a slight detergent advantage..over regular. With gas at its lowest in several years..I'll be running Top Tier 91RON Costco, with Chevron Techron Injector cleaner regimen every 2,500mi. With a lack of long term history of the Sky-G (no known engine tear down of cyl heads for reference, as of date), its cheap insurance. No harm, no foul. Every bit helps...


That's a myth that 93 octane fuel contains more detergents than regular 87. I have yet to see a single fuel company claim their premiums have any more, or less detergents vs. their regular. In fact they typically say the detergents are equal across the board. Octane ratings are exactly as advertised.
 

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That's a myth that 93 octane fuel contains more detergents than regular 87. I have yet to see a single fuel company claim their premiums have any more, or less detergents vs. their regular. In fact they typically say the detergents are equal across the board. Octane ratings are exactly as advertised.
More detergent or not (which is why I still use a bottle of Chevron Techron every 2,500mi, since 1st OCI), this engine was designed primarily (13-14:1 compression ratio), with premium gas in mind anyways. Btw, page 3-23 of the 2014 M6 Manual does state an "87 or above" Octane Rating requirements. At $2.74/gal here for Costco 91 Top Tier (5X more detergent than EPA requirement)..it's only a 0.20 difference, over regular. What is an extra $3.28/full tank of 16.4gal..for a noticeable difference, with better driveability/pep of engine. It's well worth it. Affordability, no question. I'll obviously not argue, over $3.28..:wink2:
 

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More detergent or not (which is why I still use a bottle of Chevron Techron every 2,500mi, since 1st OCI), this engine was designed primarily (13-14:1 compression ratio), with premium gas in mind anyways. Btw, page 3-23 of the 2014 M6 Manual does state an "87 or above" Octane Rating requirements. At $2.74/gal here for Costco 91 Top Tier (5X more detergent than EPA requirement)..it's only a 0.20 difference, over regular. What is an extra $3.28/full tank of 16.4gal..for a noticeable difference, with better driveability/pep of engine. It's well worth it. Affordability, no question. I'll obviously not argue, over $3.28..:wink2:

Can't argue the motor runs a little better on 93 octane, but it's definitely not worth the added cost to me.


You are fortunate premium's only 20 cents more per gallon in your area. Premium is easily 50 cents+ more per gallon in my location.


On top of the added fuel cost, my Mazda 6 gets a few less mpg's using premium. It's a lose lose situation for me to use premium.
 

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Right, don't argue about $3.28.

If you keep your car for 200,000 miles, and average 30mpg (I don't believe your BS claims of 41mpg at 85mph or whatever garbage you said earlier) over the life of the vehicle (which you might be lucky to accomplish as it ages).

200,000 miles / 30miles per every gallon = 6666.66 gallons (the devil just smirked)

And let's say premium is $0.20 to $0.50 more per gallon... You're spending $1,333.33 to $3,333.33 over the life of the car. If not more, because premium is likely more than $0.50 per gallon extra.
 

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200,000 miles at 12k per year is around 16 years off the top of my head, I don't think that is unreasonable to spend an extra 1,333 dollars in todays dollars over 16 years for the extra enjoyment and satisfaction and cleaner running engine of the higher octane and possibly even better gas mileage. And most everywhere I've been in my life it's an extra 10 cents for every 2 octane.


I really think 93 is a bridge to far for this car stock or even modified, but without a tune. I DO get better MPG on 91 vs 87, but I'm not so sure I would still be even better at 93, it could be worse.
 

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200,000 miles at 12k per year is around 16 years off the top of my head, I don't think that is unreasonable to spend an extra 1,333 dollars in todays dollars over 16 years for the extra enjoyment and satisfaction and cleaner running engine of the higher octane and possibly even better gas mileage. And most everywhere I've been in my life it's an extra 10 cents for every 2 octane.
Over here on the east coast we have 81-89-93 to choose from and, while it used to be 20 cents/gallon more for premium, it is now 45-50 cents/gallon difference (87-93). I drive ~25k miles/year and the gas savings was a huge reason for me getting the Mz6. Putting 93 octane in my BMW was growing more costly every year. Just dropping to 87 octane saves me ~$40/month (ignoring increased mpg with the Mz6).

Because of the now significant price difference between 87 and 93, I would only be interested in a tune for 93 octane if there was a reflected increase in mpg's.
 

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Discussion Starter · #78 ·
premium.. at one time netted me worse MPG, but I never ran it for more than one tank. After the car has had significant time to learn it's limits, my MPG has never been better. I'm averaging 35 MPG again in the cold weather, with some more city driving than normal. Also just threw on some LRR tires with a might bit more bite than the OEM tires (and incredible turn-in.. uh-oh! I'm gonna be tempted to wear these out fast).

So far just that little "mod" alone has been a rather noticeable help according to instant in my usual areas (which was rather indicative of what was to come with the techron as well.. so we shall see).


Also for those curious, I talked to my dealer about the MPG issue before, they seemed to feel it was a random chance fluke, and a full injector cleaning is recommended at the 45K service :) (my next visit FYI)
 

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I dunno, but US gas is actually a joke (max I can muster here in Los Angeles is 91RON)..compared to what the rest of the world offers, moreso compared in other 1st World (Heck, my home country in the Far East, the so called "super premiums" even has up to 100RON pumps, readily available.)

==Regional variations==
The selection of octane ratings available at the pump can vary greatly from region to region.

  • Australia: "regular" unleaded fuel is 91 RON, "premium" unleaded with 95 RON is widely available, and 98 RON fuel is also reasonably common. Shell used to sell 100 RON petrol (5% ethanol content) from a small number of service stations, most of which are located in major cities (stopped in August 2008).[22] United Petroleum sells 100 RON unleaded fuel (10% ethanol content) at a small number of its service stations (originally only two, but it has now expanded to 67 outlets nationwide).[23][24] All fuel in Australia is unleaded except for some aviation fuels.

  • Bahrain: 91 and 95 (RON), standard in all petrol station in the country and advertised as (Jayyid) for Regular or 91 and (Mumtaz) for Premium or 95.

  • China: 93 and 97 (RON) are commonly offered. In limited areas higher rating such as 99 RON is available. In some rural areas it can be difficult to find fuel with over 93 RON.

  • Chile: 93, 95 and 97 RON are standard at almost all gas stations thorough Chile. The three types are unleaded.

  • Colombia: "Ecopetrol", Colombia's monopoly of refining and distribution of gasoline establishes a minimum AKI of 81 octanes for "Corriente" gasoline [25] and minimum AKI of 87 octanes for "Extra" gasoline.[26] (85 RON corriente, and 91 RON for extra)

  • Costa Rica: RECOPE, Costa Rica's distribution monopoly, establishes the following ratings: Plus 91 (at least 91 RON) and Super (at least 95 RON).[27]

  • Croatia: All fuel stations offer unleaded "Eurosuper BS" (abbreviation "BS" meaning "no sulfur content") 95 RON fuel, many also offer "Eurosuper Plus BS" 98 RON.[28][29] Some companies offer 100 RON fuel instead of 98.[30]

  • Cyprus: All fuel stations offer unleaded 95 and 98 RON and a few offer 100 RON as well.

  • Denmark: 95 and 98 RON are common choices. Some varieties of low percentage Ethanol mixtures are offered at larger gas stations. E85 is being implemented but has yet to be finalized in the parliament.

  • Ecuador: "Extra" with 87 and "Super" with 92 (RON) are available in all fuel stations. "Extra" is the most commoly used. All fuels are unleaded.[31]

  • Egypt: Egyptian Fuel Stations had 90 RON until July 2014 where the Government found no use for it. Leaving only 92 RON and 95 RON. 80 RON is found in a very limited amount of fuel stations as they are used only for extremely old cars that cannot cope with high octane fuel. 95 RON in used by limit due to its high price (more than twice the price of 92 RON).[32]

  • Finland: 95 and 98 (RON), advertised as such, at almost all gas stations. Most cars run on 95, but 98 is available for vehicles that need higher octane fuel, or older models containing parts easily damaged by high ethanol content. Shell offers V-Power, advertised as "over 99 octane", instead of 98. In the beginning of 2011 95 RON was replaced by 95E10 containing 10% ethanol, and 98 RON by 98E5, containing 5% ethanol. ST1 also offers RE85 on some stations, which is 85% ethanol made from biodegradable waste (from which the advertised name "ReFuel" comes). RE85 is only suitable for flexifuel cars that can run on high-percentage ethanol.[33]

  • Germany: "Super E10" 95 RON and "Super Plus E5" 98 RON are available practically everywhere. Big suppliers such as Shell or Aral offer 100 RON gasoline (Shell V-Power, Aral Ultimate) at almost every fuel station. "Normal" 91 RON is only rarely offered because lower production amounts make it more expensive than "Super" 95 RON. Due to a new European Union law, gas stations are being required to offer a minimum rate of the new mixture of "Super" 95 RON with up to 10% Ethanol branded as "Super E10".[citation needed] Producers are discontinuing "Super E5" 95 RON with <5% Ethanol[citation needed] so cars that are unable to use E10 must use 98 RON petrol instead.

  • Greece (Hellas): 95 RON (standard unleaded), 97+ & 100 RON unleaded offered by some companies (e.g. EKO, Shell, BP). Also available Super LRP 96 RON for older (non-catalytic) vehicles.

  • Hong Kong: only 98 RON is available in the market. There have been calls to re-introduce 95 RON, but the calls have been rejected by all petrol station chains, citing that 95 RON was phased out because of market forces.

  • India: India's ordinary and premium petrols are of 91 RON. The premium petrols are generally ordinary fuels with additives, that do not really change the octane value. Two variants, "Speed 93" and "Speed 97", were launched, with RON values of 93 and 97. India's economy-class vehicles usually have compression ratios under 10:1, thus enabling them to use lower-octane petrol without engine knocking.

  • Indonesia: Indonesia's "Premium" petrol rated at 88 RON and being subsidized it cost only about US$0.65/liter. Other options are "Pertamax" rated at 92 RON and the "Pertamax Plus" rated at RON 95. "Pertamax Racing Fuel", a bioethanol flexfuel rated at RON 100 (sold in gallon can container only). Total and Shell stations only sell RON 92 and 95 gasoline.

  • Ireland: 95 RON "unleaded" is the only petrol type available through stations, although E5 (99 RON) is becoming more commonplace.

  • Italy: 95 RON is the only compulsory gasoline offered (verde, "green"), only a few fuel stations (Agip, IP, IES, OMV) offer 98 RON as the premium type, many Shell and Tamoil stations close to the cities offer also V-Power Gasoline rated at 100 RON. Recently Agip introduced "Blu Super+", a 100 RON gasoline.

  • Israel: 95 RON & 98 RON are normally available at most petrol stations. 96 RON is also available at a large number of gas stations but 95 RON is more preferred because it's cheaper and performance differences aren't very wide and noticeable. "Regular" fuel is 95 RON. All variants are unleaded.

  • Japan: Since 1986, "regular" is >=89 RON, and "high octane" is >=96 RON, lead free. Those values are defined in standard JIS K 2202. Sometimes "high octane" is sold under different names, such as "F-1".

  • Latvia: 95 RON and 98 RON widely available.

  • Lebanon: 95 RON and 98 RON are widely available.

  • Lithuania: 92 RON, 95 RON and 98 RON widely available. In "LUKOIL" gas stations E85 (bioethanol) gasoline, 98E15 (15% of ethanol), 98E25 (25% of ethanol) are available.

  • Malaysia: Had RON 92 until September 2009. Replaced with "regular" unleaded fuel Ron 95 RON, "premium" fuel is rated at 97 RON (but for Shell 97 RON is V-Power 97, and Shell's V-Power Racing is rated at min 97 RON.)[34]

  • México: Pemex Magna (87 AKI) is sold as a "regular" fuel and is available at every station. And Pemex Premium (92 AKI) is sold at almost all gas stations. Both variants are unleaded.

  • Mongolia: 92 RON and 95 RON (advertised as A92 and A95 respectively) are available at nearly all stations while slightly fewer stations offer 80 RON (advertised as A80). 98 RON (advertised as A98) is available in select few stations.

  • Montenegro: 95 RON is sold as a "regular" fuel. As a "premium" fuel, 98 RON is sold. Both variants are unleaded.

  • Netherlands: 95 RON "Euro" is sold at every station, whereas 98 RON "Super Plus" is being phased out in favor of "premium" fuels, which are all 95 RON fuels with extra additives. Shell V-Power is a 97 RON (labelled as 95 due to the legalities of only using 95 or 98 labelling), some independent tests have shown that one year after introduction[when?] it was downgraded to 95 RON,[citation needed] whereas in neighboring Germany Shell V-Power consists of the regular 100 RON fuel.

  • New Zealand: 91 RON "Regular" and 95 RON "Premium" are both widely available. 98 RON is available instead of 95 RON at some (BP, Mobil, Gull) service stations in larger urban areas.

  • Philippines: A brand of Petron, Petron Blaze is rated at 100 RON (the only brand of gasoline in the Philippines without an ethanol blend). Other "super premium" brands like Petron XCS, Caltex Gold, Shell V-Power are rated at 95-97 RON, while Petron Xtra Unleaded, Caltex Silver, and Shell Super Unleaded are rated at 93 RON.

  • Poland: Eurosuper 95 (RON 95) is sold in every gas station. Super Plus 98 (RON 98) is available in most stations, sometimes under brand (Orlen - Verva, BP - Ultimate, Shell - V-Power) and usually containing additives. Shell offers V-Power Racing fuel which is rated RON 100.

  • Portugal: 95 RON "Euro" is sold in every station and 98 RON "Super" being offered in almost every station.

  • Russia and CIS countries: 80 RON (76 MON) is the minimum available, the standard is 92 RON and 95 RON. 98 RON is available on some stations but it's usually quite expensive compared to the lower octane rating fuels.

  • Saudi Arabia: Two types of fuel are available at all gas stations in Saudi Arabia. "Premium 91" (RON 91) where the pumps are coloured green, and "Super Premium 95" (RON 95) where the pumps are coloured red. While gas stations in Saudi Arabia are privatized, the prices are regulated by the authorities and have a fixed at S.A.R. 0.45 (U.S. $0.12) and S.A.R. 0.60 (U.S. $0.16) per litre respectively. Prior to 2006, only Super Premium RON 95 was available and the pumps weren't coloured in any specific order. The public didn't know what Octane rating was, therefore big educating campaigns were spread, telling the people to use the "red gas" only for high end cars, and save money on using the "green gas" for regular cars and trucks.

  • Singapore: All four providers, Caltex, ExxonMobil, SPC and Shell have 3 grades of petrol. Typically, these are 92, 95, and 98 RON. However, since 2009, Shell has removed 92 RON.

  • South Africa: "regular" unleaded fuel is 95 RON in coastal areas. Inland (higher elevation) "regular" unleaded fuel is 93 RON; once again most fuel stations optionally offer 95 RON.

  • Spain: 95 RON "Euro" is sold in every station with 98 RON "Super" being offered in most stations. Many stations around cities and highways offer other high-octane "premium" brands.

  • Sri Lanka: In Ceypetco filling stations, 92 RON is the regular petrol and 95 RON is called 'Super Petrol',[35] which comes at a premium price. In LIOC filling stations, 90 RON remains as regular petrol and 92 RON is available as 'Premium Petrol'. The cost of premium petrol is lower than the cost of super petrol. (Sri Lanka switched their regular petrol from 90 RON to 92 RON on January 1, 2014)

  • Sweden: 95 RON, 98 RON and E85 are widely available.

  • Taiwan: 92 RON, 95 RON and 98 RON are widely available at gas stations in Taiwan.

  • Thailand: 91 RON and 95 RON are widely available. 91 RON benzine/petrol withdrawn on Jan 1st 2013 to increase uptake of gasohol fuels.

  • Trinidad and Tobago: 92 RON (Super) and 95 RON (Premium) are widely available.

  • Turkey: 95 RON and 98 RON are widely available in gas stations. 92 RON (Regular) has been dropped in 2006.

  • Ukraine: the standard gasoline is 95 RON, but 92 RON gasoline is also widely available and popular as a less expensive replacement for 95 RON gasoline. 80 RON gasoline is available for old cars and motorcycles.

  • United Kingdom: 'regular' petrol has an octane rating of 95 RON, with 97 RON fuel being widely available as the Super Unleaded. Tesco and Shell both offer 99 RON fuel. In April 2006, BP started a public trial of the super-high octane petrol BP Ultimate Unleaded 102, which as the name suggests, has an octane rating of 102 RON.[36] Although BP Ultimate Unleaded (with an octane rating of 97 RON) and BP Ultimate Diesel are both widely available throughout the UK, BP Ultimate Unleaded 102 was available throughout the UK in only 10 filling stations, and was priced at about two and half times more than their 97 RON fuel. In March 2010, BP stopped sales of Ultimate Unleaded 102, citing the closure of their specialty fuels manufacturing facility.[37] Shell V-Power is also available, but in a 99 RON octane rating, and Tesco fuel stations also supply the Greenergy produced 99 RON "Momentum99".

  • United States: in the US octane rating is displayed in AKI. In most areas, the standard grades are 87, 89-90 and 91-94 AKI.[38] In the Rocky Mountain (high elevation) states, 85 AKI (90 RON) is the minimum octane, and 91 AKI (95 RON) is the maximum octane available in fuel.[39] The reason for this is that in higher-elevation areas, a typical naturally aspirated engine draws in less air mass per cycle because of the reduced density of the atmosphere. This directly translates to less fuel and reduced absolute compression in the cylinder, therefore deterring knock. It is safe to fill a carbureted car that normally takes 87 AKI fuel at sea level with 85 AKI fuel in the mountains, but at sea level the fuel may cause damage to the engine. A disadvantage to this strategy is that most turbocharged vehicles are unable to produce full power, even when using the "premium" 91 AKI fuel. In some east coast states, up to 94 AKI (98 RON) is available.[40] As of January, 2011, over 40 states and a total of over 2500 stations offer ethanol-based E-85 fuel with 105 AKI.[41] Often, filling stations near US racing tracks will offer higher octane levels such as 100 AKI .[citation needed]
  • Venezuela: 91 RON and 95 RON gasoline is available nationwide, in all PDV gas stations. 95 RON petrol is the most widely used in the country, although most cars in Venezuela would work with 91 RON gasoline. This is because petrol prices are heavily subsidized by the government (0.$083 per gallon 95 RON,vs 0.$061 per gallon 91 RON). All gasoline in Venezuela is unleaded.

  • Vietnam: 92 is in every gas station and 95 is in the urban areas.
  • Zimbabwe: 93 octane available with no other grades of fuels available, E10 which is an ethanol blend of fuel at 10% ethanol is available the octane rating however is still to be tested and confirmed but it is assumed that its around 95 Octane. E85 available from 3 outlets with an octane rating AKI index of between 102-105 depending on the base petrol the Ethanol is blended with.
 

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Hilarious. We spend countless $$$ up front, on superficial mods and not think twice on spending, on most times. And here we are, debating the extra 20-30 cents (or thousands of $$$ in years to come, racking up till xxx,000mi..be it the car for keeps, or not) if premium fuel is a waste. This is gas/petrol after all..the "lifeblood", powering our engines. Comparisons, indeed..

Regardless, I'm putting what is the best fuel I can get my hands on, currently..for my high compression 2.5L Sky-G engine (optimally designed, to run on premium). At $2.59/gal (downward trend ongoing, as per Gasbuddy.com) for Costco 91RON "premium" (laughable still, but better that bottom rung 87RON) Top Tier gas..I know what opportunity is (and when to grab it).
 
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