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Hi, I have an imported 3rd Gen 2013 Mazda Atenza 2.2l Turbo Diesel. 145,000KMs.

The car recently had the the check engine and oil pressure lights come on, and lost pickup/power as my partner was driving.

We got it home, and the next day the car appeared to be driving fine. I reset the codes and all went OK, then the lights came back again when my partner was driving, about 5 mins down the road.

Car is now with the mechanic, who found the oil had a metallic sheen to it. He said when the engine gets hot, it's losing oil pressure. The engine now also has a ticking sound to it.

The brakes are also not working right - car rolls an extra half a meter or so when you put the brakes on from where you'd expect it to stop.

Mechanic has told me I need to replace engine, vacuum pump, fuel lines etc. Basically it's stuffed, though he sounds like he's working off a lot of assumptions on what's gone on.

Looking for anyones two cents as the repair costs are getting close to matching the price I paid for the vehicle, and am hoping someone can talk me out of writing it off.

Only had it 6 months and I commute 100kms a day over hills, during this time the car has proved a dream to drive.
 

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That sounds like you had an injector go bad (or other incident that badly diluted the oil), didn't catch it, and after the oil light came on kept driving.

The latter is an absolute death sentence. If the oil pressure light EVER comes on you must stop the engine IMMEDIATELY and do NOT restart it until you figure out why and correct whatever is going on. You may have already done critical damage but if you keep driving it, even for a mile or so, you WILL. An oil PRESSURE GAUGE is much better since you can see the loss of pressure before the light comes on and STOP. The light won't come on until you're in serious trouble; many people call those lights the "replace engine" light because it often pretty-much means exactly that.

Usually when this happens the oil level is *high* (overfilled) due to the dilution (there's fuel in the oil!)

The most-common cause is an injector that is leaking; on a common-rail engine (all modern diesels) this is almost-instant death when it happens because the amount of fuel that gets into the cylinder when it's not firing is enough to insanely dilute the oil in a very short period of time, and in addition it washes the oil off the cylinder walls and thus causes severe cylinder damage as well. At high power levels (such as is usually the case in marine engines) this has been known to destroy an engine in seconds; in a car you sometimes have an opportunity to catch it in time -- but not always.

The same failure can and does happen in modern high-pressure rail gas-powered cars too, with the same sort of results.
 
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