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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone, I recently bought a 2020 Mazda 6 GT and had a question on a possible issue with the suspension. When I’m driving down the road, the car seems to shake a bit although I don’t feel it in the wheel. I only feel it in my legs. I know that seems weird but I just wanted to know if anyone else has witnessed that in their car? I would have thought a new car would drive smoother than that unless that’s the way the suspension is set up. Thanks for any feedback.
 

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Two suggestions @Frostman1982 : (1) check tire pressures. many times the dealer messes them up... (2) or the rear tire is not properly balanced. They may need to rebalance one of the rear wheels. (I had this before, I feel a shaking through my butt dyno but not from the front wheels to the steering wheel)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, I did consider the tires, I’ll check the pressures tomorrow. I know the car sat for a while too, could the tires have flat spots as well?
 

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yep it could have, depending on the tire construction and how long it sat for.
 

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Thanks, I did consider the tires, I’ll check the pressures tomorrow. I know the car sat for a while too, could the tires have flat spots as well?
Since COVID mine has been sitting long stretches. I just added fuel for the first time since March. I am always rolling with flatspots , especially early in the morning when it is cool.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
So I checked the tire pressures tonight and the rears were at 42 psi. I’m hoping that was the problem as I don’t feel like making a trip to the dealer if possible.
 

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So I checked the tire pressures tonight and the rears were at 42 psi. I’m hoping that was the problem as I don’t feel like making a trip to the dealer if possible.
that's pretty high... 35psi is the nominal haha!
 

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Whoa. Sorry for the thread hijack, but first tank of gas since March? That's less than 500 miles in eight months!
Also such few miles that you drive can probably lead to flat spotting heh.
 

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Flat spots... I hope my car is fine as it has been sitting in the garage for 3 months. I was thinking if overinflating the tires will help.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I’m thinking the dealer jacked up the psi because they knew the tires had flat spots. Since I changed the pressure back down it’s riding better but I’ll know more during my drive to work tomorrow.
 

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Whoa. Sorry for the thread hijack, but first tank of gas since March? That's less than 500 miles in eight months!
I know, its crazy! I started considering if I really should be adding fuel stabilizer.
After a couple weeks I roll out and its a bumpy ride for a mile or so. Things smooth out after they roll and warm.
And technically is less than 280mi (v6) actually, it's 150miles because I'm almost all city (except my monthly 4th gear freeway run.)
 

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How cold is it we are talking about? This is a brand new car and seems would be a dealer issue, at least a phone call about this. If they say bring it in, bring it in but before doing that confirm the TP is correct. If the issue persists, don't let the dealer blow you off, the tires should smooth out in 20 minutes or so depending how cold it is. You have to consider the road surface this car is being driven on too to get a proper read on the tires. With tires balanced properly, the last possibility would be a tire out of round because you can balance an out of round tire but it will never run smooth.
This is about tires taking a temporary "set" in cold weather that normally goes away. What the Michelin person doesn't say in paragraph I copied below is that the sidewalls warm up do to flexing resulting in the vibration dissipating the longer the car is driven. In this case, with tires so over inflated, the sidewalls didn't flex as much so would take longer to smooth out the ride. Over inflated tires tend to run rough in any weather but seems more noticeable in cold weather.
Flat spotting explained by Michelin below.
"When the nylon stays in this flat state for a long time, or sometimes when it transitions from a warm tire to a cold tire, it can take a “set” to this flat shape.
As you drive and your tires rotate, the “flat spot” which really isn’t flat anymore, just not quite as round as the other parts of your tire, makes your tires and vehicle vibrate. You will likely feel it in the steering wheel and maybe in the car in general. The good thing is that as you drive, your tires rotate, obviously, and your tires warm up. Both of these actions will work the “set” out of the nylon cap meaning that the “flat spot” will go away and the vibration will diminish to normal levels. The amount of driving distance and time will vary, but achieving normal highway speeds for over 20 minutes will relax most flat spotting".
 
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