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I know the turbo has only been out for a couple of weeks, but I already have 600 miles on the odo and usually like to change out oil sometime in the next 1,000 or 2,000 miles when a car is new. Nobody shows what the filter type is yet for this vehicle. Not Bosch, Fram, Mobil, or OEM websites show anything yet.

Might it be the same filter as the CX-9? Anybody buy a filter yet?
 

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It's probably the same filter as is on the CX-9, most likely. Else, you can check the dealer and see what they recommend for use. If it's the same filter as the CX-9, reference off that. Else, if it's the same as the 2014+ 6's, reference off of that as well until sites update.
 

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It's probably the same filter as is on the CX-9, most likely. Else, you can check the dealer and see what they recommend for use. If it's the same filter as the CX-9, reference off that. Else, if it's the same as the 2014+ 6's, reference off of that as well until sites update.
It is.

PY8W 14-302

I use Pennzoil ULTRA Platinum and plan on using their "best" oil filter HPZ -37
 

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If the dealer will sell you 4 for the price of 3 (they do here) buy 'em from them.

Decent price, as good as any aftermarket, and you know what you're getting.
 

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If the dealer will sell you 4 for the price of 3 (they do here) buy 'em from them.

Decent price, as good as any aftermarket, and you know what you're getting.
The dealer I bought from offers free oil changes as long as you own the car. I live 300 miles away so won't be taking advantage of them but because of that they gave me two of the oil filters (which is why I knew the part #) to take with me when I told them I change my own oil. I'll eventually use them.
 

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So I have a 2016 6 and a 2018 CX9. Both of my cars were due for a change. Was the CX9's first oil change.
I went to Walmart for a couple 5qt jugs of Mobile 1 and a couple oil filters. In the book, the Mobile 1 filters are the same for the 6(non turbo) and the CX9, so I bought a couple.

This post got me thinking why does Mazda have different filter part numbers between the two cars when the book in Walmart has then as the same.
I decided to play it safe and head to Mazda for a filter for the CX9.


Visually, the only difference between the Non turbo and Turbo 2.5 filters is the new Turbo filter has 0-ring type rubber vs the regular flat top gasket type sealing surface.


Anyways, just a heads up that aftermarket filters call for the same filters for the turbo as they do for the non turbo, yet Mazda has different ones.
 

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PY8W-14-302 is the correct number. They list for $8.25. Having spent $30,000+++ for your new Mazda 6, why would you scrimp on an oil filter? I assure you that the factory piece is as good or better quality than any of the aftermarket stuff out there.
 

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If there are Mann oil filters available for the turbo engine, that is what I would use. Mann is an OEM filter manufacturer for German cars such as BMW, and they are top-notch quality. If you drive alot in the city, change your oil often. I'd suggest using thicker oil to decrease blow-by, as these motors are prone to carbon build-up on the intake valves when driven a lot in the city.

The best time to change your oil for the first time is 3000 miles. The motor is not fully broken in until then. No point in changing sooner than this. If you drive a lot on the highway and do your own oil changes, consider changing the filter somewhere halfway into the interval while the oil is still clean. These filters are pretty small for the sheer amount of oil the 2.5L engine holds. If you cut open one of these filters after its been in your car for merely a few thousand miles, you will find that it's already quite dirty.
 

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If there are Mann oil filters available for the turbo engine, that is what I would use. Mann is an OEM filter manufacturer for German cars such as BMW, and they are top-notch quality. If you drive alot in the city, change your oil often. I'd suggest using thicker oil to decrease blow-by, as these motors are prone to carbon build-up on the intake valves when driven a lot in the city.

The best time to change your oil for the first time is 3000 miles. The motor is not fully broken in until then. No point in changing sooner than this. If you drive a lot on the highway and do your own oil changes, consider changing the filter somewhere halfway into the interval while the oil is still clean. These filters are pretty small for the sheer amount of oil the 2.5L engine holds. If you cut open one of these filters after its been in your car for merely a few thousand miles, you will find that it's already quite dirty.
Sorry, but your motor is broken in the first time its started, which is at the factory.
 

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Sorry, but your motor is broken in the first time its started, which is at the factory.
Can't say that I agree with this. Especially considering Mazda has a 600 mile "break in period" that "may add to the performance, economy and life of the vehicle".

Do not race the engine.
Do not maintain one constant speed either slow or fast for a long period of time.
Do not drive constantly at full throttle or high engine rpm for extended periods of time.
Avoid full throttle starts.
Avoid unnecessary hard stops.

No, they are not all aimed at the engine but there is most certainly a break in period for the engine and admittedly not nearly as much as older (10-20+ years) engines.
 

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Can't say that I agree with this. Especially considering Mazda has a 600 mile "break in period" that "may add to the performance, economy and life of the vehicle".

Do not race the engine.
Do not maintain one constant speed either slow or fast for a long period of time.
Do not drive constantly at full throttle or high engine rpm for extended periods of time.
Avoid full throttle starts.
Avoid unnecessary hard stops.

No, they are not all aimed at the engine but there is most certainly a break in period for the engine and admittedly not nearly as much as older (10-20+ years) engines.
And how many motors have you built? The rings either seat immediately, or they dont (which means a rebuild), theres no in between.
 

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Can't say that I agree with this. Especially considering Mazda has a 600 mile "break in period" that "may add to the performance, economy and life of the vehicle".

Do not race the engine.
Do not maintain one constant speed either slow or fast for a long period of time.
Do not drive constantly at full throttle or high engine rpm for extended periods of time.
Avoid full throttle starts.
Avoid unnecessary hard stops.

No, they are not all aimed at the engine but there is most certainly a break in period for the engine and admittedly not nearly as much as older (10-20+ years) engines.
This is a very conservative estimate. 600 Miles is good for tires and brakes. A clutch takes upwards of 1000miles. The engine does not finish fully breaking in until 3000 miles, unless you break it in the fast way by doing back to back redlines. Ask any owner who has an engine with perfect metal-wear properties and zero oil consumption (such as @tickerguy and @Byakuya) how they drove their car for the first 3000 miles of it's life. I'm willing to bet they didn't drive it aggressively.

And how many motors have you built? The rings either seat immediately, or they dont (which means a rebuild), theres no in between.
What about a new motor? So if the piston rings don't seat immediately you need to take apart your brand new motor and rebuild it? There are other parts within the motor which must be broken in too.
 

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^^ Exactly what @idrive and @Get Inline both said. I'll also add to this that the transmission on these cars (as I've said and read to/from many members of this forum) doesn't seem to really break in until about 10k miles.

I absolutely drove my 6 calm and collected until 3000 miles - I even documented it here: https://forum.mazda6club.com/consumer-reviews/258578-2014-ongoing-review.html

Specifically the "The 2014, Driven as a Daily Driver" and "3,000 Miles of Daily Driving (like an old lady):" sections.
 

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^^ Exactly what @idrive and @Get Inline both said. I'll also add to this that the transmission on these cars (as I've said and read to/from many members of this forum) doesn't seem to really break in until about 10k miles.

I absolutely drove my 6 calm and collected until 3000 miles - I even documented it here: https://forum.mazda6club.com/consumer-reviews/258578-2014-ongoing-review.html

Specifically the "The 2014, Driven as a Daily Driver" and "3,000 Miles of Daily Driving (like an old lady):" sections.
That's a good point about the transmission. I read somewhere that an ATX can take upwards of 20K miles to fully break in but I didn't want to get blasted for saying that. Any auto transmission takes a long time to break in.

... And that is precisely why your engine is in perfect condition. I heard it's also best to vary your RPM's as much as you can and avoid keeping it at one steady RPM (more city, no highway driving during this 3000 mile period)
 

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I heard it's also best to vary your RPM's as much as you can and avoid keeping it at one steady RPM (more city, no highway driving during this 3000 mile period)
That's an 'old wive's tale' but one that I've never seen disproven. I actually (very slightly) scolded my dealer because I convinced them to drive my car (the only white GT in all of New England at the time) 150 miles from another dealer, and I found out they used cruise control.

Cruise control, in my opinion, is a very big no-no until 3k miles if you want to properly break in an engine.
 

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And how many motors have you built? The rings either seat immediately, or they dont (which means a rebuild), theres no in between.
Do I get to include the go-cart engines we rebuilt when I was 8 years old?:surprise:

I've always been under the assumption that the rpm should be varied as well during break in.
 

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Do not maintain one constant speed either slow or fast for a long period of time.
Cruise control, in my opinion, is a very big no-no until 3k miles if you want to properly break in an engine.
I agree. Never a good idea to drive at a steady RPM for prolonged periods of time with a new motor. Ideally you want to vary the RPM's without revving the engine too hard, as this wears in things such as piston rings and valve stem seals quicker. As the mileage gets closer and closer to 3000 miles, you can start to gradually increase your RPM's but a rule of thumb is try not to go past 3000RPM during this period.

You can do full throttle acceleration or redline the motor once or twice here and there if you absolutely need to, but doing it repeatedly within a short period of time is what degrades rings, seals and metals causing oil consumption in your engine very quickly.

Interestingly enough, since new my car burned some 0w20 oil, about 1 quart every 6000 miles so I switched to 5W40 which made the consumption practically irrelevant. I used 5W40 for a few oil changes but my dad took the car out and did an oil change himself one time at a shop that used 0W20, and checking the dipstick I realized that the engine does not burn a drop of oil anymore. I have never seen anything like it before. Not sure if it has something to do with the times I used 5W40 in the past or perhaps the engine just sealed up on it's own.
 
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