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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Wow, people are cancelling their orders out in Europe and Australia for the SkyActive Diesel due to the problems of diesel fuel overfilling the crankcase.

Mazda's response to this is that the owner MUST check their dipstick level every 600 miles or Mazda will void the warranty if and when the engine seizes.

So Mazda is basically putting the owner on notice that if they don't check their dipstick oil levels every 600 miles, they are not performing proper maintenance and if the crankcase gets sucked dry or overfilled with diesel fuel, your engine will fail and Mazda will not cover it under warranty:

http://www.derwan.com/download/MazdaDieselCare.jpg


Mazda is also calling for oil changes every 2,000km or 1,200 miles:

Mazda CX-5 oil issue fix nearing

This has sealed the deal for me, NO DIESEL for me. Too many problems and Mazda has no solution right now and is finding band-aids to deal with it until the engineers can figure out what's happening.

So Mazda expects customers to pay a $4k premium for a diesel engine that needs to have its oil level checked every 600 miles and an oil change every 1,200 miles? Mazda really dropped the ball on this and hopefully this error isn't going to bring a demise to Mazda as it did a few decades ago before Ford bought them back from the brink of extinction.

Mazda has the desire to be innovative but they lack the testing and R&D on some of these designs. They should have done more tests on the diesel before releasing it to mass production. This will come back to haunt Mazda.

http://news.drive.com.au/drive/moto...zda-cx5-diesel-oil-issues-20120821-24k6w.html
 

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The oil rise issue is a fairly common one in Diesel operated vehicles, just ask the folks over at the Volkswagen forums. Friend of mine deals with this issue but it's really easily avoidable. With the strict emissions laws in the U.S. it's going to be real tough for car manufacturers to sell the diesel models here without having any issues.
 

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Damn. I really want a skyactiv D Mazda6 too
 

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Check the oil level every 1,000km (621mi approx) or once a month on the Sky-Activ D...so what's the big deal about this?

Heck, I check the oil level twice a month (every two weeks, no past)..sometimes, even weekly (on Sats, that's the day I usually tinker on my cars).

I could see this to be an "issue", for someone who just drives cars..and don't give crap about it.
 

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All these article's are from last fall, so enough time for them to fix any issues before the US release this fall. Even the SkyActivD race car had some issues early on.
Right now Mazda can't even build the regular 6 fast enough, they only have about a 30 day supply in the US.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Mazda just pulled all mention of the diesel from its US based website. So much for it being available soon.:rolleyes: I talked to a Mazda insider and they stated that Mazda is in serious PR damage control mode with the diesel problems.

For Mazda to fix the problem would require a COMPLETE redo on the engineering of the SkyActive diesel. In other words it's not going to happen. This is bad news for Mazda as Australian and European Mazda6 diesel owners are getting hosed on this.

No SkyActive diesel anytime soon. If Mazda releases the current problematic diesel version here in the USA, there will be some seriously pissed off new vehicle owners posting on this site.
 

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he be trollin. sounds like lbear works for ford. Let me guess ford still runs mazda.
 

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I think your "mazda insider" is smokin the good shit. Mazda race cars had some issues, but your info is old and outdated.
Mazda just pulled all mention of the diesel from its US based website. So much for it being available soon.:rolleyes: I talked to a Mazda insider and they stated that Mazda is in serious PR damage control mode with the diesel problems.

For Mazda to fix the problem would require a COMPLETE redo on the engineering of the SkyActive diesel. In other words it's not going to happen. This is bad news for Mazda as Australian and European Mazda6 diesel owners are getting hosed on this.

No SkyActive diesel anytime soon. If Mazda releases the current problematic diesel version here in the USA, there will be some seriously pissed off new vehicle owners posting on this site.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
he be trollin. sounds like lbear works for ford. Let me guess ford still runs mazda.

Typical lame & immature response by attacking the person instead of discussing the issue. Let me guess, if you disagree with someone on an issue, instead of discussing the issue you make personal attacks against that person. :rolleyes:

If you even bothered to read the articles you would have seen that the issue is real and that the problems continue to this day. Mazda is simply changing the oil ever 1,200km to prevent engine damage from diesel fuel overfill contamination. There already has been a few engines that have seized due to overfilling of the crankcase with diesel fuel.

I don't worship at the altar of any car company. I own a Mazda and if Mazda screws up on its engineering it needs to step up to the plate and fix it correctly and permanently. I am not a blind loyalist for any car manufacturer. I can think for myself.
 

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Lbear it does sound like you're jumping to conclusions based on some dated information. The Diesel issue does not only apply to Mazda other car manufacturers are having trouble with it in the US market as well. These checks are similar to what my buddy does with his TDi, just being cautious nothing to go crazy over. I do regular checks now and I don't even have diesel, tires, oil level etc.. these should be part of everyone's basic maintenance schedules.
 

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I do regular checks now and I don't even have diesel, tires, oil level etc.. these should be part of everyone's basic maintenance schedules.
Yeah, too bad it's not...

That's one of the many problems with society: Something for Nothing. I was always taught that a car will take care of you if YOU TAKE CARE OF IT. I check my tire pressure, oil, coolant, and brake fluid levels, refill my washer fluid, etc. every Saturday morning, no matter how early my day starts.

I'm not saying that Mazda's diesel problems would easily disappear if regular checks were performed, but I'd bet at least HALF of all repairs would either be scaled down or eliminated completely if regular checks were made by owners.
 
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If you even bothered to read the articles you would have seen that the issue is real and that the problems continue to this day. Mazda is simply changing the oil ever 1,200km to prevent engine damage from diesel fuel overfill contamination. There already has been a few engines that have seized due to overfilling of the crankcase with diesel fuel.
The last comments in any of those articles is from last year. If people would be concerned they would continue to post. There might have been some initial issues but there have been no reports in the last 9 months.

In some European countries diesels make up to 75% of the sales and for sure we would see people posting about issues. You made a comment about people in Europe canceling their orders, but no evidence was provided.:eek:
 

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Unless I missed it there is nothing about diesel engine over there now :eek:
It defaults to the gas engine and there is a link to click to switch to diesel. It is between the Gas and transmission, once you select diesel the link become the gas engine link.

less emissions while consuming less fuel.Learn more about SkyActiv®-D engine
Engines Main
Last Feature Next Feature
Weight and mechanical friction reduction enhances efficiency

After tackling thermal inefficiencies, we set our sights on cutting down friction and weight. Nearly every engine part and component was examined and redesigned to trim unneeded mass and reduce friction.
  • Lighter pistons and piston pins (20% reduction)
  • Lighter connecting rods (15% reduction)
  • Reduced piston ring tensile force (37% reduction)
  • Narrower crankshaft main journals (6% reduction in diameter, 8% reduction in width)
  • Adoption of roller finger follower (greater than 50% reduction in valve friction)
  • Adoption of compact electronic variable pressure oil pump (approx. 45% reduction in oil pumping loss)

Last Feature Next Feature
Sky-high 13:1 compression ratio harnesses more energy from fuel

What's the point of a high compression ratio? A bigger power stroke captures more of the expansion that happens when fuel is burned, meaning you harness a greater amount of energy from the fuel.
Until now, high-compression engines faced a tough obstacle: knock, or premature ignition. Knock is an inefficient and potentially destructive combustion process where the heat and pressure in the combustion chamber cause the air/fuel mixture to ignite too soon.
Combat knock: It's not a Clash album, it's the job of an array of innovations in the SKYACTIV®-G engine. These breakthroughs stave off excess temperatures in the chamber and speed up combustion to prevent knock, allowing the engine to achieve an astonishing 13:1 compression ratio on 87 octane gasoline. The Ferrari 458 reaches only 12.5:1 on premium. Rock on, Mazda.


Last Feature Next Feature
4-2-1 exhaust system fights engine knock

Hot air: beloved by balloons and politicians, but an enemy of engine efficiency. Averting knock in a high-compression engine requires minimizing excess heat in the combustion chamber to avoid prematurely igniting the air/fuel mixture. So we developed a special 4-2-1 exhaust system with an extended pipe length that prevents the exhaust pulses from one cylinder from pushing hot exhaust gasses back into another.


Last Feature Next Feature
Innovative piston cavity improves emissions, ignition

While the 4-2-1 exhaust system helps to prevent knock, it poses complications of its own. Because of the system's length, the emission-controlling catalytic converter normally wouldn't be able to reach the proper temperature quickly enough during cold starts.
To solve this, the exhaust is heated by slightly delaying the ignition timing. However, too much delay can cause unstable combustion. We came up with a novel solution: a cavity in the top of the piston that helps to stabilize combustion, even with delayed ignition.
The top of the piston is also dome-shaped. Not only does this make it look like a volcano, which is pretty cool, but it also helps to achieve high compression by reducing the volume of the combustion chamber.
Another method to improve knock resistance is to make combustion faster. Faster combustion means less time for the remaining air/fuel mixture to suffer those high temperatures, and that means less time for knock to rear its ugly head. The piston cavity also prevents the first milliseconds of flame from slowing itself down by hitting the top of the piston.


Last Feature Next Feature
Advanced direct injection system stabilizes combustion

Another method to improve knock resistance is shortening the duration of the combustion. The faster the combustion, the shorter the amount of time the unburned air/fuel mixture is tossed around in those high temperatures. That means less time for knock to rear its ugly head.
With super-high fuel pressure of 2,900 psi, the SKYACTIV®-G six-hole injector improves vaporization and cooling of the air/fuel mixture, and mixes up the fuel more evenly.
It also provides much faster injection, allowing the fuel delivery to be split into multiple injection events. This helps to optimize the distribution of fuel in the chamber.
We were so obsessed with achieving optimal combustion that we studied air movement patterns inside the cylinder. Using that knowledge, the spray of fuel was adjusted to make the air in the chamber move in a tumbling pattern, helping spread the fire faster once combustion starts.


Last Feature Next Feature
Weight and mechanical friction reduction enhances efficiency

After tackling thermal inefficiencies, we set our sights on cutting down friction and weight. Nearly every engine part and component was examined and redesigned to trim unneeded mass and reduce friction.
  • Lighter pistons and piston pins (20% reduction)
  • Lighter connecting rods (15% reduction)
  • Reduced piston ring tensile force (37% reduction)
  • Narrower crankshaft main journals (6% reduction in diameter, 8% reduction in width)
  • Adoption of roller finger follower (greater than 50% reduction in valve friction)
  • Adoption of compact electronic variable pressure oil pump (approx. 45% reduction in oil pumping loss)

Last Feature Next Feature
Sky-high 13:1 compression ratio harnesses more energy from fuel

What's the point of a high compression ratio? A bigger power stroke captures more of the expansion that happens when fuel is burned, meaning you harness a greater amount of energy from the fuel.
Until now, high-compression engines faced a tough obstacle: knock, or premature ignition. Knock is an inefficient and potentially destructive combustion process where the heat and pressure in the combustion chamber cause the air/fuel mixture to ignite too soon.
Combat knock: It's not a Clash album, it's the job of an array of innovations in the SKYACTIV®-G engine. These breakthroughs stave off excess temperatures in the chamber and speed up combustion to prevent knock, allowing the engine to achieve an astonishing 13:1 compression ratio on 87 octane gasoline. The Ferrari 458 reaches only 12.5:1 on premium. Rock on, Mazda.




Engines SKYACTIV®-G

SKYACTIV®-D

The SKYACTIV®-D 2.2L TWIN-TURBO DIESEL Engine



See the diesel engine video
(2:36)

For the SKYACTIV TECHNOLOGY goal of ultimate efficiency without compromising performance, diesel is a no-brainer: Diesel fuel holds more energy per gallon than gasoline, and diesel engines put out abundant torque to launch you off the line. But conventional diesel engines are saddled with compromises; it's time to bring the technology into the 21st century. The SKYACTIV-D 2.2-liter twin-turbo diesel is a reinvention from the molecular level. It's not only clean, lightweight and quiet, it also generates the torque of a V8 while sipping fuel like a hybrid. Welcome to the future of the diesel engine.
 

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I desperately want a turbodiesel Mazda6.
 
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