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Hello, I'm looking to switch out the battery in my car with preferably an Optima Yellow Top or other suitable battery but cannot find any information about this battery size and specs to point me in the right direction. Appreciate any help, thanks.
 

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Optima's battery quality is pretty poor now so I'd stay away
 

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Hello, I'm looking to switch out the battery in my car with preferably an Optima Yellow Top or other suitable battery but cannot find any information about this battery size and specs to point me in the right direction. Appreciate any help, thanks.

I've been wondering about the battery size of our GJ Mazda6 as well. I've been doing a simple search ways before via Pep Boys, Autozone, O'Reilly, etc and even NAPA...no dice. I need to know it too beforehand just in case, prior to the original going. So, using a tape measure I went out to my car (it was cold, dark and rainy here in LA). The dimensions are a fraction in excess of 9X7X8 (LXWXH). The parts and cross references are the ff:

0000800035WB ; AM15-18-520B; AM1518520B; AM43-18-520A; AM4318520A; E564-18-520B; E56418520B; E566-18-520C; E56618520C; F221-18-520E; F22118520E; KJ01-18-520A; KJ01-18-520B; KJ0118520A; KJ0118520B

BATTERY. Mazda Mazda 6 # 0000800035WB

Of each I searched for, numbers KJ0118-520A or KJ0118520A seems like a hit and are battery/cross reference part #s for the 2007 Mazda5 , 2007 Mazda2 and the 2003 Mazda RX8.

Going through Interstate Batteries, these were the results:

Interstate Batteries Results Page - Automotive / Truck 2007 Mazda 5 L4/2.5L

Here, we have three selections (chosen the "2007 Mazda5 L4/2.5"). One is an Optima, albeit a Red Top (SC35A). The good news, it matches closest/within the dimensions of our battery. The exact dimensions are 9.31X6.81X7.63..well within the inches/fraction measurements I took earlier and within the stock battery clamp coverage.

Next, I went to Optimabatteries.com...selected "2007 Mazda5" but the only engine option was for an "L4/2.3". Here, the SC35 popped out...along with the Yellow Top. Somehow the Red Top, though $40 less, has a higher rated CCA/CA.

Find a Battery | OPTIMABATTERIES

List of Common Battery Case Sizes | BCI Group Numbers

So, our Mazda6 battery size is/are: BCI: 35 or BCI: 75/25

If I were to choose an Optima, I'd likely go for a Red Top...when the stock 1850A Panasonic 75D23L goes kaput. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
ExB5 that's some great information. I too have checked out all the auto stores with no luck from them. Never thought it would be so tough to get any info on this car. My purpose for looking at the optima yellow top is that after adding in some high end audio equipment, remote start and this freezing cold Illinois weather, the parasitic drain is just high enough to kill out my battery with enough time. The yellowtop dual purpose would help with that slow drain and still easily start the car. The redtop is mainly for having really good starting ability. I had the battery checked out at a couple dealerships and they say its good on there testers but when a couple of friends hooked it up to there battery pullers it fails and has a low amp capacity. I have no interest in fighting that system, I'd rather just upgrade this battery to a better AGM style battery.

I think I might have to take this info and hit up the auto stores and see if anything fits.
 

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Perhaps we need a sticky on the Electrical Forum for battery specs. The manual says a replacement battery has to have a minimum of 19 amp hour rating for adequate power drain capability during extended non-usage periods, or accessory use when the engine is off. I'm not sure what minimum cranking amps and cold cranking amp specs are for the stock battery. Perhpas somebody on this board knows how to test that?

Not helpful for the original posters specific needs mentioned above, but for others, I posted a separate thread in this forum on using a Braille B2015 lightweight (AGM) battery to save 15 lbs of weight. It's working fine, and I expect it to have double the life of the stock battery, which helps with the extra cost over a regular battery. My 2001 miata had a factory Panasonic AGM battery that lasted 9 years, which apparently is pretty common. As mentioned in that thread low cold cranking amps is the only potential concern for non sunbelt state locations.
 

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Perhaps we need a sticky on the Electrical Forum for battery specs. The manual says a replacement battery has to have a minimum of 19 amp hour rating for adequate power drain capability during extended non-usage periods, or accessory use when the engine is off. I'm not sure what minimum cranking amps and cold cranking amp specs are for the stock battery. Perhpas somebody on this board knows how to test that?

Not helpful for the original posters specific needs mentioned above, but for others, I posted a separate thread in this forum on using a Braille B2015 lightweight (AGM) battery to save 15 lbs of weight. It's working fine, and I expect it to have double the life of the stock battery, which helps with the extra cost over a regular battery. My 2001 miata had a factory Panasonic AGM battery that lasted 9 years, which apparently is pretty common. As mentioned in that thread low cold cranking amps is the only potential concern for non sunbelt state locations.
19A minimum..How about connecting two Brailles in parallel. With that enough space left...you'll get the same voltage flow, but a sure slam dunk on current output. :)

Btw, how much did the Braille cost?
 

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$199 each, not cheap, but you're right, you'd end up with 40 amp hour capacity and decent cold start ability. LoL. The stock tray isn't quite big enough for two side by side though...
 

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$199 each, not cheap, but you're right, you'd end up with 40 amp hour capacity and decent cold start ability. LoL. The stock tray isn't quite big enough for two side by side though...
I could use a Braille here in SoCal, but $199...and a gaping odd-like looking battery space (could be better if enough, for a 2nd Braille) that needs to be "filled" (insert connotation here, :lol:). Ouch!

But that's just the practical side of me..:D
 

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The AGM battery typically:

1. Has less active area (if a "spiral cell" such as the Optimas) .vs. flooded, which means fewer AH of actual capacity. Mass and actual active volume, in short, is directly proportional (more or less) to amp-hours.

2. Has MUCH lower internal resistance, which means you can both charge and discharge it (much!) faster than a flooded cell. An AGM can be safely charged at 0.5C ("C" = amp-hours) and with care you can charge them at 1C or better; most flooded batteries should not be charged at greater than 0.1C. Again, in a car this probably doesn't matter (but it sure does for some other applications!)

3. Has MUCH better cyclic endurance, which matters only if you actually do cycle it (that is, deeply discharge it repeatedly.) AGMs can be discharged to 20% of capacity without material harm to their service life where flooded batteries must not be discharged below 50% on a regular basis. Even one complete discharge on a starting battery can do serious damage or even destroy it due to sulfation and intra-cell short-circuits. However -- most car batteries rarely if ever see cyclic service as they're usually only drawn down a few percent for starting purposes.

4. They have no liquid electrolyte and thus will not (normally) emit corrosive fumes or liquid into your engine compartment; the electrolyte is in a nominally-saturated fiberglass-like material.

5. They are very intolerant of improper charging, specifically overcharging, which will cause them to vent and permanently lose electrolyte and thus capacity. They cannot be topped off unlike a flooded battery that can. This becomes very important in both very cold and very hot climates as the proper charge voltage and current limits are temperature-sensitive, and most AGM manufacturer specifications prohibit charging at all beyond 120F. I've yet to see a car with both a battery temperature probe input and ECU-regulated charging. Both temperature and computer charge-state control are normal for environments where AGM batteries are most-common (e.g. standby power, etc.)

6. Is considerably more-expensive than a flooded battery of equal capacity.

I like AGMs in their proper application but IMHO a car starting battery isn't one of them, with one of the biggest problems being proper charge control that is utterly necessary if you want good service life.
 

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I like AGMs in their proper application but IMHO a car starting battery isn't one of them, with one of the biggest problems being proper charge control that is utterly necessary if you want good service life.
So I'm confused, how does an alternator mischarge a battery? I understand if the battery sits around a long time and needs a separate charge to happen could be screwed up, but otherwise if it has the same amphour capacity as a regular battery for the application then it never needs separate charging and should be fine right?

Like I mentioned before my Miata factory Panasonic AGM battery lasted 9 years, although I do live in San Diego which has a relatively mild climate.

I've been driving around with my AGM battery for several weeks now in temps ranging 40-85deg and have noticed no change in battery performance, so unless something weird happens like a full battery drain over some screwy circustances I expect it to continue to be fine.
-Tim
 

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The proper charge voltage for a battery is temperature-dependent. AGMs are intolerant of overcharge and will be destroyed by that. This is a problem in a car application because the alternator doesn't know the battery's internal temperature.

With a flooded cell overcharges boil off the electrolyte, but you can replace the water. You can't do that with an AGM.
 

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Thanks Sideways, glad to be the guinea pig!

I'm not too worried. I think the most important thing is having the right capacity which this braille battery does. I'm sure most of the horror stories are more related to people getting overzealous with the appropriate lightweight AGM battery. I ran into a BMW 5 series thread where they burned out the B2015 and smaller brailles in a couple weeks, but their stock battery is 52 lbs as opposed to our 30lb unit.

I also read that some new alternator systems utilize temperature sensors and vary the charging voltage accordingly which would help with the issue described by Ticker Guy.

Regardless I've still got the factory battery, worst thing that happens is I have to go back to it for a 15lb hit.

Here is Braille's data for my battery:
http://www.braillebattery.com/index.php/braille/product_batteries/b2015

"At under 15 pounds, the B2015 is out most popular non-carbon racing battery. It is able to start larger engines easily for racing and offers daily driving capability for 4 cylinder motors with ease."

Voltage 12
Full Charge Voltage 13.2
Pulse Cranking Amps (PCA) 1067
Cranking Amps (CA) 574
Amp Hour (AH) 21
Cold Cranking Amps (CA) 426
Reserve Capacity (RC) 35 mins.
Life Cycle @ 10% DOD 3100
 

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Lithium ion batteries are even MORE intolerant of charge/discharge voltage, rate and temperature violations than are AGMs -- and they like to catch on fire when you violate the rules too, instead of just being ruined.
 

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For anyone looking to get an AGM battery, I highly suggest staying away from Optima's. When they first hit the market they were manufactured in the US & were MUCH better than they are today. I believe it was BCI who snatched up the Optima brand & relocated manufacturing elsewhere & of course, quality suffered.

On top of that, the "6 pack" or spiral design isn't very effective or efficient. Surface area is key & splitting it into 6 cells loses potential surface area.

I would seriously look into the DEKA brand of batteries which I believe are made by JCI. The matting in them is layered in a typical rectangle/square casing which gives much more surface area.

I put a DEKA 9AGM48 in my first gen. The fit was perfect without the risk of denting my hood with the posts. The specs were better across every section than any of the Optima choices and it was cheaper too!

Just thought I'd add in my 2¢ to the topic.
 

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If I'm going for "practical" on a Grp 35..I'd get the Kirkland Signature 12865 (from Costco, around $60; a CR "Best Buy") or in short order/closest to home (where I frequently get caught with a dead one) a Bosch Premium Power 35-640B ($90 from Pep Boy's; No.1 by CR).
 
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