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I'm changing the rear pads for the rear of my 07 M6, and I need to push the caliper back down using this tool instead of the clamp tool I used on the front, but I cannot get the piston to go down, Service manual says to turn it clockwise, which I do, but I cannot get this piston to go down or turn without extreme difficulty and effort. This is with the brake fluid cap off and bleeder off the caliper too, and because of the limited space and the caliper isn't locked down on anything, it is also insanely difficult to get the tool on the piston properly while also having the caliper firmly stable.

  • Caliper is not seized
  • E-brake is off
What am I doing wrong? Am I missing something? Managed to get it decompressed by a tenth of an inch, but we can't get it to go any lower.
 

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Hello from the UK. I am a technician.
If your handbrake is electric then you must use a diagnostic tool to tell the car you intend to change the pads.
Other than that those cubes are kinda useless and you often end up nipping your fingers with them. Anyway you need a piston rewind kit it fits into the caliper and provides downwards force at the same time as rotational force. Or just continue with the cube and really put your back into it but take care not to strain the brake fluid hose.
Good luck!
 

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Long needle nose pliers and be EXTRA careful not slip and pierce the rubber boot cover. A study hand is important and go slow with slowly building force. Those cube tools never worked on any car that I’ve owned. Right on the downward and rotational force, but no electric ebrakes on Mazdaspeed 6’s.
 

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You can try this out:


I have confirmed the method and it works for 2017-2018 model. I hope it will also work for your car model.

When replacing the brake pads, you need to disengage the EPB. You should not turn or force the pistons of the rear brakes or you risk destroying it.

You press the start button twice, without depressing the brakes. This will not start the engine but the ignition switch is ON.

This is what it looks like with the EPB engaged, engine OFF. The parking icon is just above the battery indicator.





Then you depress the brake pedal and release the parking brakes (" handbrake"). The parking icon should disappear.





You now enter maintenance mode by doing the following:

1. Fully depress and hold the accelerator.

2. Push and hold the parking brake.

3. Push the start button thrice.

You should hear a long whirring sound from the parking motor, longer than usual when you are engaging the parking brakes.

You are now in maintenance mode, and you should see the parking icon lit up (with exclamation point) besides the check engine light.





You can now turn off the car and do whatever you need to do for the rear brakes. The rear brakes is now like the front brakes, you can just push the pistons easily and there's no need to turn it.


Once you are done, press the start button twice without depressing the brake pedal.

You can now exit the maintenance mode by doing the following:

1. Fully depress and hold the accelerator.

2. Pull and hold the parking brake.

3. Push the start button thrice.

Again, you should hear a long whirring sound and the parking icon, with exclamation mark, should disappear besides the check engine light.
 

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I have a black 2007 Mazda Speed 6GT with 58,500K bought new. This car has a manual parking brake. Many people used to call it an emergency brake hence people calling it an E brake not to be confused with new car electronic E brake system. I wish our 2019 CX5 had the old hand brake!! It's just more gee-whizz crap to go wrong and expensive to fix down the road.
There is nothing easy about working on modern rear brakes for a new-be or someone that has done it before. Unless you work on brakes for a living, they are not worked on often enough so they can present a challenge to anyone. I used needle nose pliers on a 2006 Mazda 3 we had years ago but that was a frustrating hard way to go but all I had at the time. Since then I bought an Orion disc brake caliper kit. The Mazda 3 pistons didn't turn in very hard, the reason I got away with using needle nose pliers! The MS6 was entirely different, they turned in hard even with the Orion brake kit.
Last year I decided to finally replace the nasty grim creating factory brake pads and all the rotors with drilled type so had to retract the rear pistons to do it. They turned in very difficult so I was glad I had the Orion Brake Tool kit.
Even though the car has low mileage, it's still 13 years old so while apart I wanted to inspect the pistons and cylinders inside for condition and glad I did. There was a little crud in the cylinders and pistons. In the process I damaged one of the cylinder/piston "O" rings so had to replace it and it's Teflon back up ring. That was no fun!!
When going back together, be sure to leave the piston X groove in vertical position so brake pad tab can engage the groove.
Also while apart, replace the brake fluid. I have done this for decades before it was even talked about. If the car is driven hard with lots of hard braking, it's especially important to replace the brake fluid every two years and a must when pads are replaced. This can all be done by one person with a one man bleeder. If done by yourself, don't lose track of keeping master cylinder full.
 
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