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Discussion Starter #1
I think it's the battery. I was parked at a friends- turned on my hazards and talked to him for 10 minutes or so. I got in my car and suddenly it wouldn't start- nothing.

So AAA comes- charges it- I turn the lights on and it all dies again.

One more charge and I am able to drive it home and now dead again.

I'm guessing its the battery- although a 3 year ol,d car with 46,000 miles- whould the battery be dead? Nothing was left on- so not sure why it died.

AAA said they can install a new one for $119 is that a good deal? Or should I have it towed to the dealer (which is covered under warranty) and see what they say.

Is battery covered under warranty? And if not- how much could I expect to pay at the dealer?
 

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I'd just get an aftermarket battery. It'll power your car better than any OEM one. And they don't die as fast. AND they're lighter weight usually, like an Optima red/yellow top, etc.

I've been having some trouble w/ mine on the crank sometimes, but it's never totally died like yours. I've got an 03 6s w/ about 41k. Looking to replace mine soon as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I'd just get an aftermarket battery. It'll power your car better than any OEM one. And they don't die as fast. AND they're lighter weight usually, like an Optima red/yellow top, etc.

I've been having some trouble w/ mine on the crank sometimes, but it's never totally died like yours. I've got an 03 6s w/ about 41k. Looking to replace mine soon as well.
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Yeah it seemed on startups for the past week it was coughing a bit- guess that should have tipped me off. To save time I'll probably have the AAA guy come by and install the $119 one so I don't have to run around all day looking for the best deal.
 

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$119 is not really a bad deal but you could do it yourself for around $100.
But if AAA will come out to your house and do it... That's kind of hard to beat, if they use a high quality battery.
 

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You can get a ride from your friend, buy the battery at a local autozone/pep boys and install it yourself to save money.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Turns out it is partially covered under MAzda- and if I bring it in to the dealer- it will cost me a total of $85.

Of course since its a Saturday he said it might take an hour or 2 and also I woiuld have to get it towed to the dealer which is covered by the warranty but again an hour or so wait. Plus, I'm not big on having my car towed for 10 miles.

Might be worth the extra $34 just to have the guy come and do it here for me.
 

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Turns out it is partially covered under MAzda- and if I bring it in to the dealer- it will cost me a total of $85.

Of course since its a Saturday he said it might take an hour or 2 and also I woiuld have to get it towed to the dealer which is covered by the warranty but again an hour or so wait. Plus, I'm not big on having my car towed for 10 miles.

Might be worth the extra $34 just to have the guy come and do it here for me.
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You should be able to pick up a battery from Walmart, Costco, Autozone, Sears... just about anywhere for about $75. It's not exactly a complicated swap on the 6. Remove the cables, remove two nuts, remove old battery. Installation is the reverse of the removal. Save yourself $50 and just go buy an aftermarket unit. $85 from Mazda (under warranty) is downright laughable. They must have seen you coming...
 

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IMO, the oem battery sucks. I've had to replace mine twice. And the second only lasted about a year, if that much. Right now I have one of those Autozone (Duralast?) specials and have been extremely happy with it so far.
 

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IMO, the oem battery sucks. I've had to replace mine twice. And the second only lasted about a year, if that much. Right now I have one of those Autozone (Duralast?) specials and have been extremely happy with it so far.
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Not sure how much credence you lend to Consumer Reports, but here's their latest assessment of auto batteries:

Car batteries: Some go the distance

hidden from view Covered batteries like the one on this Nissan 350Z can make installation and upkeep harder. Batteries with caps (at rear) require periodic care.
Batteries may look alike on the shelf, but under your hood it’s a different story. Our tests show that some are far more likely than others to last longer and provide more cranking power.

Longer life is especially critical if you take lots of short trips and you do at least some of your driving in warm-weather regions. Quick drives shorten battery life by offering little recharging time, while high temperatures can increase oxidation within the battery and boil off the electrolyte needed for current.

Our life test mimics those tough conditions by measuring how many repetitive, 100-hour drain-and-recharge cycles batteries can handle before their cold-cranking voltage falls below an industry-specified minimum. Models that excelled in that test endured as many as seven drain-and-recharge cycles, compared with less than two for the worst performers.

Widely varying life-test results aren’t the only reason to be picky about your next car battery. Some models provide more cold-cranking amps (CCAs) for frigid climates, where thickened engine oil and reduced battery capacity make starting harder. Months of grueling battery tests also revealed that one year’s top-performing brand isn’t necessarily another’s. Here are the details:

Two big names trade places. Sears’ DieHard batteries have consistently performed well in our past tests, while Wal-Mart’s EverStart brand often trailed the pack. This year, the EverStart batteries we tested were among the better performers, while DieHards didn’t score as well.

Many batteries are hard to reach. Chrysler, Nissan, and Volkswagen are among the growing number of carmakers that put batteries beneath covers under the hood, rear seat, or trunk, in part to insulate them from engine heat. While that might help battery life, it can make removal and replacement an hour-long project. Less access can also pose maintenance hassles, since most batteries have capped cells that should be checked and filled with distilled water as needed: once a year in most areas, twice a year in hot climates.

Few meet cold-cranking claims. CCA has long been a selling point for cold climates. But claims are often inflated, since manufacturers base their ratings on tests that charge batteries at a higher voltage than a car’s charging system provides.

Just 6 of the 39 batteries we tested met their CCA claims at the real-world, 14.5-volt charging standard we use; 4 of those 6 were EverStarts. Several other models came close. That’s a step up from last year, when just 1 battery met its claims, but it’s still an unimpressive showing.


CR recommendations:
Best for cold climates:
1 NAPA $80 (65)
4 ACDelco $90 (65)
13 ACDelco $90 (75)
22 EverStart $40 (24/24F), CR Best Buy
24 EverStart $60 (34/78), CR Best Buy
32 NAPA $60 (35)
34 Autocraft $50 (35)

The EverStarts (22, 24) are especially good values within their group sizes.
If you live where it’s warm:
1 NAPA $80 (65)
2 Duralast $60 (65), CR Best Buy
15 NAPA $70 (75)
26 ACDelco $90 (34/78)
32 NAPA $60 (35)
34 Autocraft $50 (35)

All of these scored relatively well in life and reserve capacity. The NAPAs (1, 15, 32) and Autocraft (34) scored well for CCA, a plus for trips to cold areas. Also consider the Nascar (16) if you’re willing to trade some life for a low price.

Here's another CR buyers guide from Yahoo...

http://shopping.yahoo.com/premium/consumer...tml?id=95700426
 

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Thanks for that post cwa107, that's some good info. My own experience with diehard was so-so. I used them in my last car and if I got 2 years out of one, that was good. Here it's warm and I do a lot of short trips so that's probably why my requirements are pretty high. I've never tried adding more electrolyte though. Seems like most batteries nowadays are sealed in such a way as to prevent any tampering. Maybe it's a good idea to add once a year like the article said.
 

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Odd that you would say the stock battery is bad. Most stock ones I have seen last for years and years with out problems.

Only thing I would stay away from are the cheapies. But heck they are so cheap you can afford to replace them every 2 years and still be ahead on money. LOL

Dont pay the 119, or 85 to have someone else do it. It is very easy to change, and for 119 you can get a very nice battery.
 

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Odd that you would say the stock battery is bad. Most stock ones I have seen last for years and years with out problems.

Only thing I would stay away from are the cheapies. But heck they are so cheap you can afford to replace them every 2 years and still be ahead on money. LOL

Dont pay the 119, or 85 to have someone else do it. It is very easy to change, and for 119 you can get a very nice battery.
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Yea, changing your own battery is incredibly easy, save your money for other mods and buy a good battery thats not oem.
 

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You can get a ride from your friend, buy the battery at a local autozone/pep boys and install it yourself to save money.
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autozone installs it for free if you take the car to their store location.
 

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I just replaced the OEM battery on my 6. It lasted to about 42000 miles. I was doig electrical stuff like dim lights and sluggish starts so I changed it out. About the going to wal-mart to pick one up...forget about it, they do not have one. I checked at mine here and they didn't even have one in their catalog. I had to go to Kragens and pick one up for 92 bucks out the door, I should have just got an Optima. Why are our batteries so damn big? Another thing...forget about getting an air filter there also, same story. Kind of sucks but thats Wal-Mart for you.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Yea, changing your own battery is incredibly easy, save your money for other mods and buy a good battery thats not oem.
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Ahh well- too late I paid the $119. I didn't have a ride to get anywhere to buy a new one - and I don't have any tools either.

From the time I called them to the time they showed up and put the batery in- took about 30 minutes total.

As opposed to the Mazda daeler who told me - since it was a Saturday- I'd have to wait at least 2-3 hours once I brought the car in.

Thanks for those CR ratings though.

They gave me a AAA battery. We'll see how good it is I guess.
 

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AAA batteries are rebadged ... i forgot what brand, i will find out tomorrow when i get to work
 

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Discussion Starter #19
It should have taken about 10 minutes total...

and that is with crappy tools
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Well, it took him about 5- I just meant form the call - to him arriving to changing it. As opposed to Mazda that wanted to take 3+ hours.
 

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Batteries require maintenance. You have to check the fluid level at least once a month, more often if you've added high electrical draw equipment to your car. If the fluid level is low, add distilled water, never tap water. If very low it may need more acid solution added (I've never had it that low so I'm not sure if there is a readily available substitute.)
 
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