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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
:) Hey all, Happy Holidays :D

I am new to this club and am kicking myself for not joining sooner. This is a great source of help and information. I look forward to getting to know you all better.

I have read numerous posts about the types of tires for the 2003 Mazda 6 s tires (215-50R17). I live in NJ and need new tires bad. I know understand that replacing the OEM tires is not worth the money or the effort.

I have researched and researched about different types and have been told many things about tires but I am still unsure. Can anyone tell me which tire would best work for the conditions in NJ, and not break my bank. So far it seems like the Bridgestone Turanza and the Yokohama Avid may be good for me but i am now seeing Falkien and Toyo which i never heard about before. Can anyone help? Thanks in advance. :?:
 

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I live in New Jersey too, where in are you? BTW put your location in your personal setting makes it much easier for other members. Welcome to the 6Club! As for the tires, look up Toyo Proxes4. They Ultra High Performance All-Season tires that will be good in all conditions of weather that we face! I have a set of Toyo T1-r's but those are coming off very soon! $82 a tire, plus shipping.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the tip, I live in Newark and the roads have not been good for my tires, the potholes are crazy.
However I am not at 54000 with my tires so I guess I did not do so bad.

I will look up the TOYO's. I have never heard of them before coming to this site. Is Edge racing the best place to get them?
 

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Falkens are good too, rides comfortable. You can get them at Sears Auto Center, they will also include a $25 Sears Gift Card and free life time tire rotation.
 

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Kumho Ecsta ASX or AST's are great tires and are inexpensive to boot!
 

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hehee...I just replaced my Michelin's! :hoho:

but :welcome9: to 6club!
 

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:) Hey all, Happy Holidays :D

I am new to this club and am kicking myself for not joining sooner. This is a great source of help and information. I look forward to getting to know you all better.

I have read numerous posts about the types of tires for the 2003 Mazda 6 s tires (215-50R17). I live in NJ and need new tires bad. I know understand that replacing the OEM tires is not worth the money or the effort.

I have researched and researched about different types and have been told many things about tires but I am still unsure. Can anyone tell me which tire would best work for the conditions in NJ, and not break my bank. So far it seems like the Bridgestone Turanza and the Yokohama Avid may be good for me but i am now seeing Falkien and Toyo which i never heard about before. Can anyone help? Thanks in advance. :?:
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Tell us more about how and where you drive, and what your priorities are.

Do you commute on the train and drive the '6 only on weekends?

When it snows, do you leave the car in the garage, or try to brave the weather in your car?

In choosing between price and safety, do you squeeze out the extra cent for safety or whistle past the graveyard with the money you saved in your pocket?
 

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Welcome to the club. This is a great place for info. Enjoy your 6.

I'm running Toyo's and they're great. :drive:
 

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what did u replace them with and are you happy?
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I'm I happy?.....Uhhh...A tire...is a tire to me....As long as it rolls I'm happy :yesnod:
 

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I've never had them on the 6, but on my last car I had a brand of tire called Avon. They came from TireRack. They were excellent in snow and rain, and they're also pretty reasonably priced.
 

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Well I have the Michelins and I don't have many miles on the car yet. I have always loved Michelins. I have had many sets of them and they have always outlasted the other tires I have used. I have heard that the average tire lasts about 40,000 miles. Don't know if thats trues but i have usually gotten 65-70 and beyond from Michelins. My advice is not only does the car perform the same, but do the tires have the same longevity? I have not owned Toyos but I hear they are just as good. I live in the suburbs of Chicago and my wife drives into the city daily. Any other comments out there on this? Good luck on your search.

Kev
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Tell us more about how and where you drive, and what your priorities are.

Do you commute on the train and drive the '6 only on weekends?

When it snows, do you leave the car in the garage, or try to brave the weather in your car?

In choosing between price and safety, do you squeeze out the extra cent for safety or whistle past the graveyard with the money you saved in your pocket?
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I drive 25 miles one way to work and park on the street at all times. I am definitely interested in comfort driving. While I want to save money, i almost spent the money on the replacement of the Michelins just because I felt that the original tires would be the best ones.

I drive the cars every day and would definitely need to weather the snow and the rain at all times. lol in regards to your comment about the graveyard, i want to get a good tire with a good deal.
 

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I drive 25 miles one way to work and park on the street at all times. I am definitely interested in comfort driving. While I want to save money, i almost spent the money on the replacement of the Michelins just because I felt that the original tires would be the best ones.

I drive the cars every day and would definitely need to weather the snow and the rain at all times. lol in regards to your comment about the graveyard, i want to get a good tire with a good deal.
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Basically, you have to choose between weathering the rain and weathering the snow. It is easy -- and incorrect -- to think of rain as defective snow, and that a tire that gives traction in snow "therefore" will give traction in rain. In fact, were you a tire designer, designing a tire for the Mazda6, at some point in the design process, you would have to decide whather you would make the tire good in snow or whether you would make it good in rain: the design objectives are opposite. For snow tarction, you need a tread compound that adheres to moisture (snow); for rain traction, you need a tread compound that sheds water so that the tire touches the pavement intimately, not separated from the pavement by a film of water adhering to the tread. If the best snow traction gave the best rain traction, then the beat rain tire would be a tire with chains.

Similarly, when you talk of a "good deal," many people (not necessarily you) mean "good treadwear." However, there is pretty much a direct correlation between long wear and hard rubber compounds, and pretty much an inverse correlation between hard rubber compounds and good braking (wet or dry). The harder the tread compound, the better the wear, and the worse the braking performance. It is a compromise, and you make your choice with your wallet.

If you are going to drive every day in a Northeast winter, your best bet is to run winter tires from Thanksgiving through the end of February, and three season tires ("summer" tires) the rest of the year. Long run, because you are not wearing out the three season tires in the winter and are not wearing out the winter tires the rest of the year, the cost for the two sets of tires option is about the same as running one set of tires year round, but the initial capital outlay is higher.

If you are set on running one set of tires year round, then consider the Nokian line. On the one side of the line is the Nokian NR-Z, a three season tire that can be adequate in light snow. On the other side of the divide is the Nokian WR, an "all season" tire weighted toward winter traction, but which has fair competence in the spring and fall.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
thanks very much.

Basically, you have to choose between weathering the rain and weathering the snow. It is easy -- and incorrect -- to think of rain as defective snow, and that a tire that gives traction in snow "therefore" will give traction in rain. In fact, were you a tire designer, designing a tire for the Mazda6, at some point in the design process, you would have to decide whather you would make the tire good in snow or whether you would make it good in rain: the design objectives are opposite. For snow tarction, you need a tread compound that adheres to moisture (snow); for rain traction, you need a tread compound that sheds water so that the tire touches the pavement intimately, not separated from the pavement by a film of water adhering to the tread. If the best snow traction gave the best rain traction, then the beat rain tire would be a tire with chains.

Similarly, when you talk of a "good deal," many people (not necessarily you) mean "good treadwear." However, there is pretty much a direct correlation between long wear and hard rubber compounds, and pretty much an inverse correlation between hard rubber compounds and good braking (wet or dry). The harder the tread compound, the better the wear, and the worse the braking performance. It is a compromise, and you make your choice with your wallet.

If you are going to drive every day in a Northeast winter, your best bet is to run winter tires from Thanksgiving through the end of February, and three season tires ("summer" tires) the rest of the year. Long run, because you are not wearing out the three season tires in the winter and are not wearing out the winter tires the rest of the year, the cost for the two sets of tires option is about the same as running one set of tires year round, but the initial capital outlay is higher.

If you are set on running one set of tires year round, then consider the Nokian line. On the one side of the line is the Nokian NR-Z, a three season tire that can be adequate in light snow. On the other side of the divide is the Nokian WR, an "all season" tire weighted toward winter traction, but which has fair competence in the spring and fall.
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If you want all-seasons I'd get Toyo Proxies 4's, Falken Zeix 512's or Kumho ASX's.

I'd say the Toyo's are the best of those 3, but the Falkens are cheap and pretty good. I have those now in 215/45/17 and they were under $300 shipped from Vulcantire.com
 
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