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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So our 2014 Mazda6 turned 100,000 miles a few days ago.

The service log book supplied doesn't really have any details on what maintenance is suggested / due at or beyond100k miles. (unless I am missing something while reading it).

As far as I know, ATF has never been changed on this car, as it followed schedule 1 for maintenance most of its life (almost all highway miles). Since 80k miles car has been on normal schedule 2.
--Mazda recommendation is NOT to change ATF, ever - is that correct, as it's some "lifetime" ATF? My friend who's an auto mechanic says don't listen to that and just get it changed at this point. (Transmission works perfectly, btw)
Is it prudent to get it changed/flushed at this point, or should I just listen to Mazda recommendation?

Where can I find info on what services need to be performed at 100,000 miles, either schedule i or II?

I want to be informed before making an appt at the dealer, as I don't want them suggesting a bunch of unnecessary services. I know that I changed cabin and engine air filters a few weeks ago, so they should be good to go.

Thanks in advance for any pointers/tips.
 

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Technically there is no 100k mile service.

Replace the spark plugs IF they weren't changed at 75K or after.

IF the car was serviced at 90K there is nothing to do but change the oil if it is due.

Everything else is an inspection and lube of hinges and locks.

That's it. Don't let them BS you and tell you otherwise. If the inspection shows worn parts ex. hoses, belts etc. that are worn out then have them replaced.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the reply!
I am pretty sure the spark plugs were done after 75k so that should be OK.
I think cooling system service was also done not too long ago.

I am gonna call them and make sure I am right about above 2 things and If I am, i guess it's just general inspection and oil change which really is due.

I am just confused as I see some people here have gotten ATF changed although Mazda manual clearly recommends against it.

Thanks again!
Technically there is no 100k mile service.

Replace the spark plugs IF they weren't changed at 75K or after.

IF the car was serviced at 90K there is nothing to do but change the oil if it is due.

Everything else is an inspection and lube of hinges and locks.

That's it. Don't let them BS you and tell you otherwise. If the inspection shows worn parts ex. hoses, belts etc. that are worn out then have them replaced.
 

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A lot of Manufacturers are doing this lifetime tranny - rear end oil now.

Only thing that would require a fluid change is if it has been submerged in water.

Only other item you may consider is if you track your car or run some very spirited runs where you might be working the brakes hard, getting them hot then it's a good idea to flush the brake fluid. Some people (myself included) think you should do it every four, five years or so regardless of how you drive.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Wife's car so the car doesn't get any track use, hard driving etc. When I drive I do drive it in a more spirited manner for short periods but nothing that would put the AT under any special amount of stress.
The brake service (pads/lines flushed) was actually done at dealer at around 82k miles.

Thanks!
A lot of Manufacturers are doing this lifetime tranny - rear end oil now.

Only thing that would require a fluid change is if it has been submerged in water.

Only other item you may consider is if you track your car or run some very spirited runs where you might be working the brakes hard, getting them hot then it's a good idea to flush the brake fluid. Some people (myself included) think you should do it every four, five years or so regardless of how you drive.
 

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Brake fluid EVERY TWO YEARS irrespective of miles. It picks up moisture and will trash internal components (calipers and, the big problem, the ABS pump!) if you don't.

It takes under a half-hour to do with a power bleeder and a bottle of fluid. Essentially ALL German vehicles have this on their mandatory service schedule and since I adopted it I've not had to change ONE SINGLE BRAKE COMPONENT other than pads and rotors on any vehicle I've owned -- over the space of more than 15 years. No master cylinders, no calipers, no ABS pumps, nothing. Just do it; it's easy, it's fast, and a Motive power bleeder costs about $50 and lasts forever if you don't put fluid in it (which you shouldn't, just use it for air pressure.)

IMHO ATF is a 5/50 or 5/100 deal and change the *filter* (which requires dropping the pan.) Yeah, that's kind of the manufacturers to not make that filter externally accessible and put a nice drain plug in the bottom of the pan too. Bastidges. There's friction material that gets into that fluid by design on all ATX boxes and you either get it out of there or *eventually* the box will fail either due to fluid contamination or low line pressure due to the filter plugging up. It's just a matter of time and the manufacturers don't give a crap because it'll be out of warranty and they expect you to trade or sell the car and buy another one around the 100k mile mark. These newfangled ATX boxes are essentially all non-rebuildable as the parts required to do so are frequently unobtainium along with the jigs and such to properly set clearances inside the unit so IF you have a failure you're talking several thousands of dollars, likely enough to economically total the vehicle. Oh by the way when you have the pan off retorque all the valve body attachment bolts (there are a bunch of them on most ATX designs); it is extremely common for these to loosen up over time, they typically are all in the ~10-12ft/lb range (not very tight!) as the bolts are usually screwed into aluminum so you CANNOT GUESS (strip one and you will be crying!) and if they do loosen you'll leak line pressure which will lead to slow engagement and/or slipping and eventual destruction of the gearbox.

You decide.

Incidentally if you're into "I wanna drive this thing for 200,000+ miles" and have an ATX then the FIRST thing you do after buying the vehicle is put in an auxiliary transmission cooler AFTER the one that runs through the radiator core and BEFORE the return to the gearbox along with a temperature gauge if you can't pick it up from a scantool (if you can, then use that.) The goal is to run 175F or LOWER on the transmission fluid under all normal driving conditions and NEVER EXCEED 200F. Modern vehicles all run in the 200-205 area under load in their coolant for fuel efficiency reasons, it's not uncommon for the gear oil to run 20F above that, and that's just too darn hot!
 

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Further to Tickerguy's comments re automatic transaxles: consider plumbing-in a 2 micron (very tight filter media) bypass filter... between the line out to the cooler and the line back from the cooler. Not in-line!... but in a bypass arrangement. Minimal ATF cooling reduction.... but i do also recommend adding a stacked plate style ATF cooler immediately downstream of the in-rad cooling coil... ATF filtered to 2 microns will REALLY improve transmission life, along with frequent "pan drops" + internal filter changes. Get rid of the abrasive swarf circulating in the ATF! I forget the Dutch made unit that is available (was Eagle Pitcher I think.... but now taken over by an American firm). Here it is: NTF Filters: http://www.ntf-filter.com/faq.html Also, use a "bung" on the pan to properly detect ATF temp (or Scangauge if u can). ATF temp detected in the rtn line from the cooler does not represent the bulk ATF temp properly. Use LIFE STRIPS stick-on telltale "tempilabels"...to determine what the max temp your 'box has gotten to. Dots on the Life strip are triggered when sump temp reaches the specific temp dot.... and the color change of the dot is permanent.
 

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EVERYONE has their own opinion about service when it comes to what and when.

Do what you think is best but if you're looking for a "guide" then simply follow the manual.

IMO the engineers that built these cars know what the need and what they don't. Another thing is modern "fluids" are far superior today than they were a few years back.

I am a maintenance fanatic, have been all my life. My transportation company has accumulated over 21 million miles now. It's taken me awhile to get used to the longer service intervals from years past but as each day goes by it is proven to me that things have changed for the better. Even still a couple of the hardest things in life for me are to not change the oil at 3k miles and flush the tranny at 30K.

Follow the manual and then add what ever extra service makes you happy. In the end it's your money. Spend it as you like.
 

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EVERYONE has their own opinion about service when it comes to what and when.

Do what you think is best but if you're looking for a "guide" then simply follow the manual.

IMO the engineers that built these cars know what the need and what they don't. Another thing is modern "fluids" are far superior today than they were a few years back.

I am a maintenance fanatic, have been all my life. My transportation company has accumulated over 21 million miles now. It's taken me awhile to get used to the longer service intervals from years past but as each day goes by it is proven to me that things have changed for the better. Even still a couple of the hardest things in life for me are to not change the oil at 3k miles and flush the tranny at 30K.

Follow the manual and then add what ever extra service makes you happy. In the end it's your money. Spend it as you like.
I totally agree. Engineers know what they built and when to service or not service at all. If Mazda engineers believed their AT needed an oil change after 'x' miles they would have clearly said so in the maintenance schedule. No manufacturer wants an expensive thing like a transmission blow up, get a bad name and lose tons of customers. The fluids are much better these days and so are the filters and components. If the manual say do it then do it otherwise no need.

During the 17 years lifetime of my old 1997 Nissan Maxima I had brake fluid flushed only once. Same with transmission fluid though the manual specifically stated to flush AT every 30K miles. Never had transmission or brake problems, eventually I gave away the car at 170K miles as I got bored of it. If a 1997 car can withstand that kind of beating I am pretty sure a 2014 Mazda will ace it to 200k miles without changing the ATF. As far as brake fluid goes, for Schedule-1 it does not even talk about inspecting. Only for the harsh Schedule-2 it recommends inspecting the fluid every 5000 miles.

The point I am trying to make here specially we the older folks who drove 80s, 90s cars need to get away from that mindset and acknowledge that cars are built much better today and don't need the kind of unwarranted maintenance those vehicles did.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Interesting responses everyone, and thanks for the feedback.


The 100k service was done (just oil change and general inspection, bla bla), and they refused to even INSPECT the ATF; saying to my wife "it's a sealed unit" which I know is BS. I was not there to speak with the service advisor. (I should have sent a copy of the MAZDA service manual where it addresses servicing AT or checking ATF level on these cars with my wife)


I am still undecided, esp after talking to 2 other dealerships which DO offer ATF change as a service ($199) on Skyactive ATs and didn't seem surprised at all about my inquiry. I will make a new post in a bit with a poll to see how members of this forum have dealt with this "issue" to get a better idea so we all benefit from the feedback. I will also include how different dealerships reacted to the ATF fluid change request inquiry in my post.
 

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Sorry, I just cannot fathom how many folks seem unwilling to recognize that by way of design a torque converter Automatic Transmission, with each shift-event, delivers wear-debris into the ATF - wear-debris that contributes to the premature wearing-out of the antifriction (i.e. rolling-element) bearings, and the steel pistons-in-aluminum bores within the valve body, etc. etc. When the A/T inevitably starts to give problems of a disabling nature, the car likely will have to be economically sent to the scrap yard as the cost of rebuild (or the ability to find a rebuilder for said transaxle) will make this the inevitable outcome. For the cost of dropping the fluid and changing the OEM thru-filter, the preventive maintenance cost is squat in the grand scheme of things. Just be sure absolute cleanliness is observed and very careful adherence to achieving the correct fluid level (which changes with ATF temp) is observed.

The reluctance of Mfr's to spec this pre-emptive mtce is based on them trying to demonstrate that their vehicles have less over-life mtce costs than the next Mfr's products... and also, it contributes to planned obsolescence and therefore the need to replace the vehicle.
 

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Sorry, I just cannot fathom how many folks seem unwilling to recognize that by way of design a torque converter Automatic Transmission, with each shift-event, delivers wear-debris into the ATF - wear-debris that contributes to the premature wearing-out of the antifriction (i.e. rolling-element) bearings, and the steel pistons-in-aluminum bores within the valve body, etc. etc. When the A/T inevitably starts to give problems of a disabling nature, the car likely will have to be economically sent to the scrap yard as the cost of rebuild (or the ability to find a rebuilder for said transaxle) will make this the inevitable outcome. For the cost of dropping the fluid and changing the OEM thru-filter, the preventive maintenance cost is squat in the grand scheme of things. Just be sure absolute cleanliness is observed and very careful adherence to achieving the correct fluid level (which changes with ATF temp) is observed.

The reluctance of Mfr's to spec this pre-emptive mtce is based on them trying to demonstrate that their vehicles have less over-life mtce costs than the next Mfr's products... and also, it contributes to planned obsolescence and therefore the need to replace the vehicle.
There is a magnet on the under pan of the housing to catch the metallic debris. It prevents them from entering the transmission system. Check out the comments section of the Youtube video "Mazda CX-5 Tranny Drain and Fill How to", one of them Tim W wrote ""changed mine at 60k and it was very clean. The magnet was clean, the filter had nothing noticeable in it and the fluid was still very transparent."

The planned obsolescence argument is so naive. I have yet to come across any manufacturer that wants his vehicle die quickly hoping the customer will choose that brand again. Assuming this preposterous theory were true they would either recommend not changing the engine oil at all or once every 30,000 miles instead of 7500 in the hope that the engine would blow up in 5 years and the 'Happy' customer would write a check for another brand new Mazda.
 

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Uh huh.

You do realize how a clutch works, right? There is friction material that wears slightly on each engagement. Guess where that material goes? INTO THE FLUID!

With a stick this clutch material is OUTSIDE the gearbox. But if you've ever changed a clutch, well, you know how much of that crap there is all over the bellhousing. On an ATX it is INEVITABLE that material will go into the fluid.

ENGINES have external oil filters because products of combustion and external contamination inevitably get into the oil. But there are no CLUTCHES in an engine that intentionally shed abrasive material BY DESIGN. There are in EVERY ATX; including DSGs!

You're utterly nuts if you think that material won't eventually clog the filter and that its presence doesn't increase wear. Yes, there's a magnet on the pan (just like there is on the drain plug of a MTX) to catch *ferrous* shavings from the gears and such, but there's quite a LOT of non-ferrous debris in the fluid as well.

Every time I drop an ATX pan I wipe out a material amount of material off the bottom of it.

EVERY.
SINGLE.
TIME.

Never ONCE have I NOT had anything to wipe up and clean out in an ATX pan. Never.

You go ahead and believe manufacturers don't know this, and that it's perfectly fine to leave all that in there for the life of the car. Go ahead and also believe that the fluid works just fine at 205-220F, which is about where it runs in most stock configurations with modern higher-temp cooling systems.

Neither is true, and if you have an ATX and want to keep it without having to either replace it or junk the car then (1) keep CLEAN fluid in there, which means you must change it on a reasonable interval and (2) the FIRST thing that goes on the car when you buy it is an auxiliary transmission cooler that is plumbed in AFTER the in-radiator-core one and BEFORE the return to the transmission. Mount it in FRONT of the radiator (preferably, if your car has an open place for it, where it's not obstructing anything behind it either) and size it so your fluid never goes over 175F. Those two things will double or better an ATX lifespan, provided it doesn't suffer from crap design (unfortunately some do!)
 

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I never argue with people for obvious reasons. It's up to the owner to decide how/when he wants to service his vehicle. Just keep in mind these are not you Granddad's car(s).

I will say that IMO putting a tranny cooler on this car (2018) is indeed a waste of time and money. It's not needed. In fact it could actually cause it more harm than good by not being able to achieve it's designed operating temperature.

But, spend your money they way you want to spend it. I know I certainly spend mine the way I want to.
 

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TickerGuy, other than Mazda engineers no one here knows the materials and design parameters of the ATX. We don't know what friction material they used or how it is bonded. It is possible they used material that provides good friction yet produces negligible amount of shavings unlike your older cars which flaked lot more. It is possible the little flake off that occurs has so tiny particle size that it does not clog the clearances. It is possible that the total amount of those metal shavings during the lifetime of the ATX are easily captured and sequestered by the magnet. I would trust Mazda engineers any day than text book theory based off of my grandfathers' cars. Also I mentioned about my Maxima that proved the text book theory to be false.
 
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